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I'm getting a little restless with BitInstant's 'transfer to bitcoin address' being down. Is there a workaround? Maybe register a Bitstamp account and use that as a middleman to my wallet?

I'm reading into the few options that BitInstant has up right now but I'm just wondering if anyone has first hand experience. Also, does it take long to transfer from the option you use to a wallet?
Thanks in advance.
Edit. Thanks everyone. I ended up creating an MTGOX account and doing BitInstant cash > MTGOX > Blockchain wallet > SR. Flawless.
submitted by goingTofu to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

Who is the richest Bitcoin owner?

Technically, Bitcoin was worth less than 10 cents per bitcoin upon its inception in 2009. The cryptocurrency has risen steadily since then and is now worth around $6000 per Bitcoin. This is the most remarkable appreciation of the value and has created many millionaires over the last eight years.
Here are the top ten people/institutions that held a large amount of Bitcoins over time:
1. Satoshi Nakamoto
The creator of Bitcoin, who hides behind the moniker Satoshi Nakamoto, remains the major holder of bitcoins. The number of bitcoins that Nakamoto owns today is estimated at around 1.1 million, based on the early mining that he did. This is the equivalent of about $6 billion at today’s exchange rate of 1BTC to 6,098 USD. At least Nakamoto has never touched most of his bitcoins, and neither converted them into real-world currencies nor used them for any other purpose. If he were to sell his entire stash, the value of Bitcoin could plummet in an instant.
2. Bulgaria
Bulgaria is currently sitting on one of the biggest stashes of Bitcoin in the world. How did the European nation come into the possession of this enormous sum of money? A crackdown on organized crime by the Bulgarian law enforcement in May 2017 resulted in the seizure of a stash of 213,519 Bitcoins, enough to pay off a quarter of the country’s national debt.
According to Bulgarian authorities, the criminals used their technical prowess to circumvent taxes. As of June 2018, the virtual coins would be worth more than $1.2 billion. The Bulgarian government has declined to comment on the status of the coins.
3. BitFinex
BitFinex, a crypto exchange, has one of the largest bitcoin wallets with 163,133.38 BTC that are worth approximately $1 billion at the current price of $6,098.24 per bitcoin. The coins are believed to be kept in a cold wallet to protect them from cyber hacks, unauthorized access and other vulnerabilities that a system connected to the internet is prone to.
4. The FBI
The FBI is one of the largest renowned holders of Bitcoin. In September 2013, they brought down Silk Road, the infamous dark web drug bazaar, and seized 144,000 Bitcoin owned by the site’s operator Ross Ulbricht, better known as, “Dread Pirate Roberts”. Ulbricht made critical blunders that allowed investigators to locate the site and link him to it. Users of Silk Road are said to have traded around 9.5 million bitcoins since Ulbricht launched the site in 2011. Even thought the FBI sold a large amount of their Bitcoin holdings or even all, the FBI worth mentioned as they had a fortune in Bitcoin at some point. A large portion of the Bitcoins seized and sold went to Barry Silbert.
5. The Winklevoss Twins
Tyler Winklevoss and Cameron Winklevoss were among the first Bitcoin billionaires. The duo had first gained popularity when they sued the Facebook C.E.O. Mark Zuckerberg for allegedly stealing the idea of creating Facebook from them. They were contacted by Zuckerberg to develop the ConnectU site, which was to become Facebook later on.
They used $11 million of the $65 million cash compensation they received from the legal dispute with Zuckerberg to purchase 1.5 million Bitcoins in 2013. Back then, one Bitcoin traded at $120. That investment has increased more than 20000% since then.
The twins allegedly own around 1 percent of all Bitcoin in circulation. Their combined net worth is approximately 400 million. They created the Windex, funded several bitcoin-related ventures and invested $1.5 million in BitInstant.
6. Garvin Andresen
Although bitcoin is the brainchild of Satoshi Nakamoto, Garvin Andresen is credited as the person who made it what it is today. Garvin is one of the people who has been suspected to be Satoshi, a claim he denies. Rather, he says that he had a close relationship with the anonymous cryptographer for many years. The real Satoshi Nakamoto picked him as his successor in late 2010. Garvin became the chief developer of the open source code that determines how Bitcoin operates – and whether it can survive. He was once paid over $200,000 in Bitcoin by the Bitcoin Foundation for his contributions. He had already cashed out multiple times.
7. Roger Ver
Roger Ver, otherwise known as Bitcoin Jesus, is one of the first Bitcoin billionaires and believed to hold or held at least 100,000 bitcoins. The renowned libertarian allegedly dropped out of college to focus on his bitcoin-related projects. Unlike other crypto billionaires out there who are throwing their cash in the typical private Islands or luxury jets, Ver’s dream is to establish his own libertarian nation where every individual is the absolute owner of their own life and are free to do whatever they wish with their person or property. The controversial bitcoin evangelist renounced his U.S. citizenship in 2014 and relocated permanently to a small Caribbean Island.
8. Barry Silbert
Silbert is a venture capitalist and founder of Digital Currency Group. He was an early adopter of Bitcoin. He purportedly walked away with an eye-watering 48,000 Bitcoins in an auction held by the U.S. Marshals Service in 2014. The US government had confiscated much of the crypto coins from Ross Ulbricht, the alleged operator of the dark web marketplace for drugs and other illegal products. Bitcoin was then worth $350, which means Silbert’s coins have skyrocketed in value from $16.8 million to $288 million.
9. Charlie Shrem
Charlie Shrem is no doubt one of the most controversial Bitcoin millionaires. He invested in a large quantity of Bitcoin in the early days of the cryptocurrency. Shrem was also an active member of the Bitcoin Foundation and founded BitInstant when he was just 22 years old. By the end of December 2014, Shrem had been found guilty of money laundering and received a two-year prison sentence. After his release from federal custody, he unveiled a startup called Intellisys Capital, a company that sells investment portfolios in blockchain companies.
10. Tony Gallippi
A famous business magnate Tony Gallippi is also believed to be one of the big holders of bitcoins. He is the brain behind BitPay, one of the most popular Bitcoin payment service providers in the world. The company was launched in May 2011 and processes over one million dollars per day. Bitpay is also one of the companies to sign contracts with major companies including Microsoft, Dell, TigerDirect, and Newegg. By 2014, the company had employed approximately 100 people.
Conclusion
It is estimated that the top 1000 bitcoin addresses own approximately 35% of the total bitcoin in circulation. There are also thousands of individuals who hold large stashes of bitcoin but have chosen to remain anonymous.
submitted by alifkhalil469 to BtcNewz [link] [comments]

Changelly scam... I think so.

I've been very patient with Changelly since August 5th when I submitted my first support ticket on this matter. Now that it's clear to me that Changelly runs a drag-it-out support strategy, it's time to go public.
Is Changelly a scam?
You be the judge... please leave your opinion in the comments.
CONTEXT
The transaction (Tx) at issue here is BTC for GBYTE (Byteball).
For those not familiar with Byteball:
Byteball has no mining; its native currency - white bytes (GBYTE) and black bytes (BB) - was created back in December 2016 and has since been distributed, as widely as possible, via ~monthly airdrops. Every full moon since December, a "snapshot" has been taken of the balance of bytes held on each and every Byteball address, and of the balance of every registered BTC address. Shortly thereafter, each address receives new bytes based on the balance at the time of the snapshot.
The last snapshot was August 7, 2017 18:10 UTC (11:10 PDT), and new bytes were distributed as follows:
One last thing: Byteball's immutable ledger of Txs is stored in a construct called a DAG (Directed Acyclical Graph), analogous in function to bitcoin's blockchain.
WHAT HAPPENED?
On August 5, two days before the Byteball snapshot, I initiated a Tx with Changelly to trade 20 BTC for ~105 GBYTE. Changelly took my BTC, but held on to the GBYTE through the snapshot, collected the airdropped Byteball reward based on the balance of my funds, and then, 4 days after I initiated the Tx, sent ~105 GBYTE.
Changelly effectively stole my ByteBall distribution reward.
When hours had passed and still no GBYTE, I sent my first ticket, and support responded:
"It seems that there could be some technical issues either with our wallet or with Gbyte network. We will investigate the matter. We have forwarded your request to the technical department. They will push your transaction through. We will inform you, once your issue is resolved!"
On August 7th, before the snapshot, I submitted two more support tickets. I told Changelly that if they couldn't deliver the GBYTE before the snapshot, I wanted my BTC back. Support responded on August 8th 2:06pm (long after the snapshot):
"Unfortunately, we cannot refund your bitcoins since they have been already converted into GBYTE. But you will receive the same amount since your money has been already exchanged. Please confirm your GBYTE wallet address and we will repeat payout. All the issues seem to be fixed now, so it should work."
I responded, explaining why the only reasonable remedy was for Changelly to refund my BTC. I did not confirm any GBYTE wallet address.
Support ignored me and sent the following on August 9th:
"Good news! We have received the response from the exchange and now everything has been delivered!"
I wrote to Charlie Shrem, an advisor to Changelly, and he forwarded my complaint to Changelly CEO, Konstantin Gladych. I've also emailed Gladych many times directly myself. Zero response.
CIVIL LIABILITY
Under civil law, Changelly has been unjustly enriched and is liable to pay restitution.
Unjust Enrichment. A general equitable principle that no person should be allowed to profit at another's expense without making restitution for the reasonable value of any property, services, or other benefits that have been unfairly received and retained.
This principle is widely recognized and applies to Changelly here regardless of whether they did anything wrong. This is essentially why Coinbase and Poloniex changed course and gave their customers the BCH that was due to them.
CRIMINAL LIABILITY
Changelly is clearly liable under civil law.
What about criminal liability?
Using a DAG explorer, we can browse Byteball's immutable ledger of Txs and discover the following:
All Changelly had to do was send it to me. What happened?
The DAG shows that the GBYTE was diverted to the following addresses, which subsequently received the airdropped GBYTE that rightfully should have gone to me:
  • 31,447,997,156 to CBCYP2UY6YX2FJX6OXNDHBQO4VREDUJL
  • 51,788,023,285 to QAHP5Z4P6QQV4S3MUVTOJM5D7SJDWPSD
  • 21,763,859,830 to 6H5USZBXMOYUAGCYEYF7P3A6QU2EJBCT
  • 306,636,259 to QR542JXX7VJ5UJOZDKHTJCXAYWOATID2
The DAG also shows plenty of Tx activity over the relevant time period, also strongly suggesting no technical issues were to blame for Changelly's delayed Tx.
Did you know…?
Under the Czech Republic's Code on Corporate Criminal Liability both Changelly and the individual perpetrator(s) would be criminally liable.
WHAT NEXT
Changelly… fix this immediately.
Up next we’ll explore…
  • how to connect employee identities to the suspicious Byteball addresses
  • inner-workings of Changelly
  • the Bittrex and Changelly APIs
  • behind the scenes of the Changelly-Bittrex connection
  • Konstantin Gladych’s relationship with the European Cybercrime Center
  • presenting evidence to Czech and U.S. prosecutors
  • comments from devs re: Changelly’s technical excuses for failed Txs
  • similarities and differences between Changelly and BitInstant
submitted by Nttwo to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating an Anonymous Wallet for Covert Practices

A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating an Anonymous Wallet for Covert Practices
With the recent Bitcoin “bubble” fiasco and the subsequent rise and fall of Bitcoin value, it seems that this subreddit has become obsessed with making money. But get-rich-quick schemes are not at the heart of Bitcoin. Instead BTC should be seen as a way to keep Big Governments and Big Businesses from knowing how much money you have and what you choose to spend that money on. As a currency, it doesn't matter how much the value fluctuates if you plan on spending your wealth on sites like the Silk Road and etc.
(OK, maybe it does matter a little bit if the money you spent yesterday is worth twice as much today; but this guide is for spenders, not hoarders. Or at least for hoarders who also like to spend.)
Let's discuss my favorite attribute of the Bitcoin protocol: anonymity.
Many noobs getting into the Bitcoin game fail to realize that anonymity is an important key to understanding the importance of Bitcoin. In places where your wealth can easily be taking away from you (see Cyprus, Russia, China, the USA and others), Bitcoin can function like a store of cash buried in a dessert in the middle of nowhere – buried so deep that nobody can find it, not even the most powerful men and women on Earth.
POINT: If you are purchasing your Bitcoins through services like Coinbase or Mt. Gox, and if you've ever given your real name and bank account information to a Bitcoin Exchange, then you are NOT anonymous. Your Bitcoins can be traced back to you. Your purchases are recorded in the blockchain, and although it's difficult, it's certainly not impossible for those with the knowhow to find you and prosecute you. See this link before continuing.
Bitcoin is not inherently anonymous. You must take steps to protect yourself in order to keep your identity a secret. And even still, if you don't know what you are doing, you run the risk of being caught. So if you care about hiding yourself and your money, I offer this guide as a way to accomplish secret purchases and covert trades. Of course I cannot guarantee you won't end up in jail. At the end of the day, nobody knows how closely governments are tracking BTC purchases over the TOR network. Some people even believe that the TOR network was created by nefarious forces. I doubt it, but you never really know.
STEP ONE: Anonymous Hardware
Because you cannot really know whether or not you are being watched, your first step in creating an anonymous wallet is to protect yourself by buying a cheap laptop computer and removing the hard-drive. Really, who needs a hard-drive anyway? Toss it in the garbage.
STEP TWO: Anonymous Software
If you don't know how to download a Linux LiveCD, then stop reading now. You are probably not skilled enough to protect yourself anyway. If you don't know how to download a Linux LiveCD, then proceed with extreme caution; downloading an ISO file and burning it to a DVD is pretty damned easy. Easier than anonymity. Those who refuse to learn are at risk.
It's arguable which software you should use, but I recommend connecting to the TOR network using TAILS, a live DVD or live USB that aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity. TAILS helps you to use the Internet anonymously, leave no trace on the computer you're using, and to use state-of-the-art cryptographic tools to encrypt your files, email and instant messaging.
ProTip: For an extra layer of protection, download the ISO from your local library's computer. Or while you're sipping a mocha at Starbuck's. Then burn it to a DVD and take it home. Place it in your crap computer (the one without a hard-drive) and turn it on. Enter the BIOS menu and boot from CD if your computer doesn't do it automatically.
DO NOT CONNECT TO THE NETWORK FROM YOUR HOME.
I repeat, for an extra layer of security, DO NOT CONNECT TO YOUR HOME WIFI USING TAILS IF YOU WANT TO DO SHADY THINGS. That's just common sense. TAILS itself isn't illegal. But if you're the type to do shady things, you don't want to practice on your home Wifi, which you probably pay for with a bank account or credit card.
After you've spent a day or two using TAILS and familiarizing yourself with the LinuxOS, and once you feel comfortable enough to continue, then head back to your local Starbucks, boot up the LiveCD, and connect. Browse the TOR network and triple-check that you are protected. You can do this by checking your IP address for DNS LEAKS. Only if you feel comfortably hidden from prying eyes will you want to continue.
STEP THREE: Creating an Anonymous Wallet
There are several different ways to to this, but the easiest way is to use the code at bitadress.org. Thanks to SpenserHanson for creating this thread which describes the process in detail:
  1. Save bitaddress.org.html to your computer
  2. Close browser.
  3. Disable computer Wi-Fi.
  4. Open bitaddress.org.html in browser.
  5. Generate an address and record the private keys.
  6. Close the browser window.
  7. Go home. Think about what you are about to do.
STEP FOUR: Funding the Anonymous Wallet
Funding your wallet will be the most difficult part of this process. Obviously you don't want to go to a site like Coinbase or Mt. Gox and link up you bank account, then start sending coins to your anonymous address. That would be stupid. Very stupid.
Probably the best way to get coins is to know someone who is willing to send you a few, but even then you lead a trail back to your friend.
My suggestion is to make cash deposits through ZipZap or Bitinstant, and give them false information (for example, use the new email you created, over the TOR network, from a site like Hotmail or Yahoo, which doesn't require a phone number to sign up – I'm looking at you Gmail. Make sure your new account forwards your email to yet another account, perhaps Tormail or a temp address. You probably won't need to use the email more than once anyway, for confirmation, if you need it. And you might want to create a new address with every deposit, just to be safe). There are other options of course. Some companies will sell you Bitcoins anonymously through Bank of America cash deposits. But remember that the moment you walk into a Big Bank and give them money, you are caught on camera. Maybe offer a homeless man some money to make the deposit for you. And hope he doesn't just pocket your money. Regardless, you want to stay away from Big Banks if you can. It really isn't that hard.
If you absolutely must make deposits from your bank account, you could send your coins to an anonymous online wallet first and then to cold storage, but make sure to use several mixing services over a period of several days. And then have trouble sleeping at night.
Another great idea is to use the localbitcoins website; meet with a seller locally; pay cash and GTFO.
STEP FOUR: Spending from the Anonymous Wallet
If you are looking to CASH OUT, there aren't many anonymous options besides meeting with somebody and selling face to face. You could always sign up for your own account at localbitcoins, then hope a buyer contacts you. But this guide isn't about making money, it's about spending your coins.
To buy things, you'll want to go to back to the library, connect through TAILS, download a lite client like Electrum and access your account. Every time you want to spend, you will have to re-download, but it should not take more than a few minutes. And though you are probably safe enough to spend directly from the client, if you really want to be safe you should send the funds to a second wallet though a mixing service, then to a third or fourth or fifth wallet, also through mixing services. These “Mixing Wallets” should NOT be created using the TOR network because the TOR exit node may be monitored. I've never had a problem myself, but it's theoretically possible that an attacker could record the password/private keys for the hosted wallet and steal your coins. Which is why you should NEVER USE THE SAME ACCOUNT TWICE. And never access your cold storage wallet through the net. That would be very very bad.
To created the mixing wallets you will also need a way to hide your identify without using TOR. The best way to do this is to sign up for a VPN service though a public WiFi hotspot and then pay in Bitcoin. The best service I have found is called Private Internet Access. You can access their service through a public computer, connect to the VPN, and voila, you now can safely create mixing wallets without exposing your password to the open network. Make sure that after you mix the coins you send them all to a safe, final address, which will be your Spending Wallet.
Remaining anonymous will cost your some time and money. With each transaction you're going to have to pay for mixing, and also the transaction fee. And setting up a new email and a new account with every transaction (so that you can spread the coins across multiple fake accounts) will be bothersome but worth it in the long run. You can't put a price on piece of mind when it comes to your safety.
REMEMBER Your Spending Wallet should not contain all of your funds. The bulk of your coins should be address you created using bitaddress. Never trust an online service to hold the bulk of your funds. The recent hacks have shown that the best place to store your private key is in your head.
Final Notes:
The Bitcoin protocol itself is not anonymous. And theoretically it's possible to trace every transaction back to you. This is why you need to use fake emails, many multiple addresses, and a VPN service with heavy encryption. Even with the knowledge and the technology to map the blockchain, the FEDS will have a hell of a time tracking multiple address though VPN tunneling back to a cold storage wallet that you created offline and only use to send coins over TOR. There are just too many roadblocks. Of course nothing is impossible. But I sleep very good at night knowing that my door is not going to be kicked in by the Men in Black. And even if you're not doing anything illegal, this sort of behavior is certainly suspicious.
If you were lucky enough to receive a tip from Reddit's own bitcoinbillionaire (I myself was not) and you haven't cashed out. Create a VPN-tunneled throwaway account and tip yourself before claiming your coins. Then send them through a mixing service and to your cold storage address. Now you're on your way to being an anonymous spender.
I hope this guide helps. I really do. The purpose of Bitcoin isn't to make money. It's to protect the money that you already have, and to protect your identity in places where your identity is compromised. Everybody in the world wants your money, especially the richest of the rich. You ought to do everything you can to keep yourself safe. Especially if you live in a compromised geography.
TL;DR: Go directly to jail. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200.
EDIT: Some typos.
submitted by anon_spender to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why would an average person actually choose to use Bitcoin?

(Cross post from https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=131154.0) That is a question that I come across quite often. For example,
From: Cardiovorax
I understand all the ideological reasons for why someone might want to choose Bitcoin. Most of them are fairly crazy, but at least they're there. What I don't get are the practical benefits, why an average person would actually choose to use them. If you aren't worried about the government or the banks or planning to get rich quickly 2140, then what can Bitcoin actually do for you? That's the part that nobody has really managed to explain so far in any of the threads, at least as far as I can remember.
To be fair, we understand the currency, it's inner workings, and thus its potential quite well, but while we profess how great it is, with $'s and stars in our eyes, we likely forget that the people we are talking to don't know or understand everything that we do. So, I think we should come up with some examples that answer the question of "why would an average person care" (or re-paste them from older necro threads). Here are some of mine:
1) It lets you send money overseas cheaper than using a bank wire (FIAT > BTC > BTC > FIAT has way better fees and exchange rates than bank wire, Western Union, etc).
2) It lets anyone open a virtual bank account without needing access to a physical bank. For example, some banks charge fees and require minimum balances for accounts, which may be prohibitively expensive. Some areas around the world don't even have banks other than in far away big cities. And in some cases, it's easier to just create a new Bitcoin wallet to store money in, than it is to drive down to a bank, fill out forms, come up with profs of ID, wait days for them to be verified, and another week for your account to actually be ready to use (especially if you're looking for a small business account).
3) It lets you accept payments online easily and way cheaper than with VISA, PayPal, or other such services. Heck, you can even just get a bitcoin address from MtGox or any other exchange, set up your account to instantly exchange any received BTC for local currency, and you're done.
4) It lets you accept payments over e-mail or any other service that can transmit text (even photos, as seen on girlsgonebitcoin). Some sellers may not have the means to build a website, but can still send out an invoice, asking to send payments to a specific address. (i.e. someone living in a poor country who only has access to an internet cafe, or someone who just doesn't have web skills).
5) It lets you accept tips or donations using any website. You can upload videos to YouTube, photos to Flickr, posts to a blog, music to Soundcloud, art to Deviantart, or comic strips to GoComics, and to accept donations all you need is to include a string of text in the description. No need to set up any money-accepting plugins, set up any bank or financial accounts, or rely on features provided by the service being used.
6) It lets you send money to places where PalPal or other money transmitting services are blocked, for example Russia or India, and is much cheaper for sending money to family in other countries. Even if that country they can't send money to is US, as in the example of the parents in Iran sending $2,000 to their college student son living here.
7) It lets you send huge sums of money overseas quickly and cheaply. If you were in US and you needed to pay $1,000,000 for a shipment from China, using normal methods of wiring money would take two or more weeks, and will cost more than $25,000 for the transaction. With Bitcoin, it takes a few hours, and costs $12,000 or less.
8) It lets you send micropayments better than anything else out there. It's easy and practically free to send $0.01 to anyone else using BTC, but would cost about $0.25 for just the fee to use the USD/EUR system. Any micropayment system that uses USD/EUR would have to sit on top of a larger system that stores all the money in a single large account, and all micropayments would have to be done as accounting entries within that account, instead of money actually moving around (i.e. you have to fund the system with a large payment, do your micropayment transactions, and withdraw when your fund is big enough again). This means micropayments using USD/EUR are restricted to only within specific services (i.e. your pre-paid micropayments fund that you use to pay for news articles can only be used within that news website)
9) It lets you create programs and services with their own bank accounts (the software stores value, as opposed to value always being linked to a real world person and a real world outside-the-service bank account). The Reddit tipbot is an excellent example of this, and would be impossible with USD/EUR, since to build it using FIAT, someone would have to open a real world bank account under their name (with all the forms, proofs of ID, etc), set it up to accept money transfers from others using PayPal, VISA, or something else, which will charge fees, have nasty exchange rates, have to keep to strict AML regulations, and be restricted to certain specific countries. Plus it would have all the micropayment issues mentioned above. With Bitcoin, all the "banking" is done with software, requiring no permissions, and no single programmer's name has to be linked with any bank accounts.
10) It lets you instantly fund USD/EUR based accounts around the world. The small LLC I started up keeps a BTC cash account for minor business expenses, and my business partners around the world will have Bitcoin funded VISA debit cards (as soon as Bitinstant releases them). That way, all the money is stored safely in the business vault, and if they need to pay for any business expenses, no matter where they are on the planet, or what their home currency is, I can fund their cards from home within 10 minutes. That's impossible with ACH, wires, or whatever else is out there.
11) It lets you link a payment account to a contract using address signing. For example, Person A agrees to buy Person B's debt. They write up an agreement contract, and instead of signing it with PGP keys, they sign it with A's and B's bitcoin addresses. Then money is sent from Address A to Address B, and any repayments are sent from Address B to Address A. That way, Person B can't claim that they never received the money, and Person A can't claim that they are still owed more than they really are, since all transactions are publicly verifiable on the block chain using the very addresses that were used to sign the contract. There is no need for any legal disputes of who owes what, since the blockchain keeps both parties honest (I actually did this already).
If you can think of anything else, please add it to the list.
EDIT: 12) Usenet has recently gone through the Wikileaks experience, with copyright behemoths pressuring VISA, PayPal, et all, to stop processing payments for Usenet service providers. Many have switched to Bitcoin since then, and I personally know Usener user who followed, now buying his btc from me for that purpose.
submitted by Rassah to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

(US) How-To, Online Poker w/ BTC - Play in minutes

This is a quick guide on how to first purchase Bitcoins and begin playing online poker in only a few minutes.
A couple disclaimers first.
SealswithClubs.eu: Will start here as you will need the virtual wallet created automatically with each new account when you purchase Bitcoins.
  1. Register an account at www.sealswithclubs.eu
  2. Once registered, open "My Account" in a browser tab and leave it open as it will be needed in a moment.
Zipmark: an iOS app available on iPhone/iPad.
  1. Install the Zipmark free app to your iPhone or iPad
  2. Register an account with Zipmark: Add all necessary info during this registration which includes bank account, address, and drivers license identification number.
  3. Leave the app open but set the device aside for a moment and get back on a computer.
BitInstant.com: the currency exchange site, USD to BTC.
  1. Register one last account with Bitinstant.com.
  2. Once registered, click New Transaction
  3. Enter the amount in USD you would like to convert to BTC and select Bank Account as the funding source. For destination choose Wallet Address.
  4. Go back to the Sealswithclubs.eu tab that you left open and copy the Current Cash-in Address. Make sure that you copy this perfectly and do not miss any character or add any additional spacing.
  5. Go back to the BitInstant page and paste the Current Cash-In Address.
  6. Agree to the terms and click Place Order.
  7. Now on your iPhone/iPad, use the the Capture Zipmark button and scan the QR code on the BitInstant page.
  8. Confirm the transaction and boom, it's done.
From here BitInstant will process the BTC transaction instantly. SealsWithClubs will have some minor delay (for me this was a little over 5 minutes). I suggest you use this time to do two things: first, install the SealsWithClubs poker application. Second, add a Google Authenticator to your SealsWithClubs account for extra security.
Good luck and if you see me online try not to take too much of money :)
Update: Spaced this reference. Thanks to music4mic and OP of the thread his comment was in.
submitted by cazter to poker [link] [comments]

Bitstamp: Yeah or Nay?

I buy a LOT of bitcoins in small increments. My favorite is bitinstant straight to bitcoin address. Anonymous and fast..at least when it was up. Maybe it will up again soon. Until then wondering about bitstamp option. Plus if straight-to-bitcoin goes down again, perhaps bitstamp will stay up like it did before. I don't see any withdrawal limits on the site. I don't see any potential ID verification requests. Can anyone with experience or more knowledge than me tell me a little more about these things and are there any other pitfalls to using bitstamp? I wouldn't keep my bitcoin there...I would transfer it to my blockchain.info wallet.
submitted by cosmicboy88 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Here's my situation. See if you can help.

upvotes for visibility would be greatly appreciated
So out of desperation with not being able to create a Bitinstant account, I asked my friend if he could use his account to buy me bitcoins. (take into account this guy has been known for being sketchy in the past, but never to me and not in a long time) He agrees and I go over to his house with the money and he sets up my transaction and is going to go do the cash deposit himself, but I offer since it's my money.
I have had multiple successful transactions in the past all that went through by the time I sat back down in the car. But it's been 3 days since I went to Wal-Mart and nothing. 0.0 BTC in my blockchain wallet.
Now I have been in contact with this dude but the only thing he can tell me is that my transaction is listed as pending in his bitinstant account. He can't log into the email he used to see if there's a confirmation email because he forgot his info and can't recover it because the recovery email he used was one of those ones that expire after not using it for a certain amount of time. All his words.
So at this point, I think it's fair that I be a little suspicious of theft (him putting in his wallet address instead of mine). I believe in innocent until proven guilty, so I'm not saying the guy did it, but it would be in the back of anybody's mind.
Today I say we should meet up. That I hate to be such a hassle but $285 of mine is just floating in cyber space and I want to get together so I can check everything out and figure out the best way to try and handle this (whether it be correcting anything we put in wrong or contacting support). He says that there's really no need to since the only info he can access is his bitinstant account and that my transaction is still marked as pending.
Not wanting to let him know I'm suspicious (could come in handy, somehow. I don't know) I say alright. That I'll just wait it out and contact support if I feel I need to.
So the main thing I want to know is if anyone is experiencing slow transaction times from Bitinstant at the moment. That would really put me at ease. But since I've had so many successful immediate transactions, and there's no talk of bitinstant being slow on forums, I feel like that can't be the case.
Ultimately I know that if I can't prove he did it (hell. even if I can), I'm totally shit out of luck. It was the risk I took, and if he has my BTC, I'm not getting them back. I just wanted to know if anyone had any advice to give.
My next move is going to be a long, well-worded, unoffensive message saying that I am suspicious. And that he could prove to me that everything is well, that would be greatly appreciated. Since he can access his bitinstant account, he would be able to show me which wallet he sent the money to, which is all I really need to turn my hate from him to bitinstant, and not feel like a complete ass.
submitted by CowboysAndAnthrax to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

The FINAL word (hopefully) on troubles getting bitcoins

1) Use Bitinstant to make a cash deposit/moneygram at walmart, have it sent directly to...
2) ....your Blockchain.info wallet you made before the transaction (easy as shit to sign up for and use)
3) Use your blockchain wallet to siphon (and subsequently tumble) funds to SR. You honestly don't need anymore anonymity than that. Quit worrying about the most secure part of this way of buying drugs, and concentrate on the riskier aspect: from the dealer's house to your hopefully non-incriminating destination address.
4) I'd recommend using mtgox as a holding area for funds even though you sign up using real info, because you can hold USD there, and it also gives you an easy and sometimes kinda profitable way to speculate at BTC trading.
5) Quit worrying that the FBI is phishing YOU, the newbie, to find your tiny potential SR drug purchases. If you were a big fish, you wouldn't be asking a clearnet silkroad forum how this all works.
Any more questions, please dear god head over to /bitcoin. There is an entire subreddit dedicated this stuff.
Bonus #6) It behooves you to use SilkRoad's actual forum site. Use this sub casually, but note all the dumb questions asked over and over and over again here. Not only will you find more/better answers on the SR forums, bonus security as it's a Tor site. Sure it's slow, but so are years in prison the more clearnet crap you have attached to your IP address.
That's all I got.
Edit Their [bitinstant's] twitter feed was saying they still were having problems doing direct transfers to mtgox accounts. You can select the big yellow funding options aarow then select bitcoin from the dropdown menu, and they give you a temporary bit coin address. That might work better than depositing directly to mtgox account numbers.
bitinstanthelp is bitinstant's twitter support feed. If your bitinstant transfer lags or seems like its stuck/not going through, immediately log a support email and include all your info from your transaction in it using bitinstant's support page. It's a vague, simple support email and feels like its going to go nowhere, but finally after 7 days (from the big mishap) i got an email asking me for more info, and within the hour it was fixed.
submitted by delicious_penguin to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

[Step by Step Guide] How to buy up to $2,000 worth of Bitcoin in about 1 hour.

This method assumes you have $20 to $2,000 worth of USD in cash on hand that you want to convert to Bitcoin. This is the way that has worked best for me, maybe a better way though.
Step 1: Go to https://www.bitinstant.com/
Step 2: Select the "Pay from" drop-down menu.
Step 3: Select the store/business you want to go to to deposit your cash payment at (I have personally used both Walmart and Albertsons successfully multiple times).
Step 4: Select the "Pay to" drop down menu.
Step 5: Select "Bitcoin Address" option.
Step 6: Open your Bitcoin Wallet.
Step 7: Create a new "receiving" address.
Step 8: "Right Click" on the newly created address.
Step 9: Select "Copy Address"
Step 10: "Paste" your receiving address to the form on the Bitinstant site.
Step 11: (Assuming you want to transfer $2,000: Put in 496 for the "Amount (USD) to pay"; Note: the reason for selecting only 496 instead of 500 is because there is a ZipZap, Inc fee of $3.95 that is charged later, and if you try to do 4 payments of 500 each, it will actually only let 3 of them go through before it will say you have reached your limit and you'll have to wait a day. So basically to avoid any hiccups just do 496 for the amount. If all you want is, say, up to $1,500 deposited, then you can put in 500 for the amount no problem. This is just to get $2,000 a day in fast, I've found using 4 payments of 496 for the amount works the best.
Step 12: Fill in your name, email, date of birth. (this is important to be correct because when you go to pay, your information better match or I would expect you would have problems.
Step 13: Prove you are human, and hit the submit button.
Step 14: Check over your quote and double check the information, when you agree, continue.
Step 15: Enter your phone number and Zip code. (needs to be correct because it will be checked for a match when you go to pay later).
Step 16: Search the map and find your Walmart or Albertsons, etc. whichever one you selected for where you are going to pay your deposit at from step 3. Click on their money-gram icon.
Step 17: Verify that the payment location you selected is showing up correctly.
Step 18: When you are finally ready to create your bill, click the button to create your payment slip.
Step 19: Wait for it to automatically generate (might pop-up as a PDF)
Step 20: Print out the payment slip this is the information you will need to bring with you in order to pay your bill.
Step 21: You will notice that the final payment amount to pay is $499.95 (This is the amount of your bill that you need to pay). Repeat, starting at step 1 again in order to process up to 4 bills or $2,000 worth).
Step 22: Go to the deposit location.
Step 23: If Albertsons, there may be a red color Money-Gram telephone by the customer service area...pick up the phone...and just listen to the instructions very carefully and it will walk you through step by step. (the amount of your bill to pay is the full amount including the fee. The first time you go through the payment process they may verify your phone number, and information you have submitted on the forms from the previous steps). Eventually, it will tell you to go to the counter to make an express payment. Hang up the phone and go to the counter and they will pull up your transaction, and you pay them $499.95 for each bill. If Walmart, or no phone: Its basically the same thing, just without the phone: go to the customer service area and pick up an express payment money-gram slip and fill it out using the information on the payment slip you printed out.
Step 24: Go back home and check your bitcoin wallet for incoming transactions...you should have your bitcoins within 10 minutes-couple hours depending how busy they are).
I hope that helps some of you! Note that there is a 3.99% fee, plus the $3.95 fee. Some people may not like this, but this is at least a way to get started with some coins. The price could go up 15% if you wait a week to get coins from another method...time is money! Once you have your coins, its easier to get them into other exchanges and stuff if you want to start trading or whatever.
If you feel this guide helped you please bump up the rating, so other people can figure out how to do these sort of transactions easier. The more people use Bitcoin and the easier they know how to get in, the better it is for all of us! I just want to help people get free. Don't forget to love your neighbor as yourself! God is love. Lets get free! :) 1DxQ6FAABJGbU1krTupo8e443bRSjJkAjq
submitted by weallprisonerschicky to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A simple, comprehensive guide for those interested in quickly acquiring bitcoins

I've been following bitcoin for a few years. Investing in BTC has a learning curve, but hopefully this guide will help you. I'll try to keep it as simple as possible. And please, if you have any questions post them, the bitcoin community is very helpful and I'm sure someone will be able to help. One more thing before I get started, I'd like to remind everyone that bitcoin isn't a get rich quick scheme. Think of it as a way to eliminate the middle men of money, the people that get rich off of manipulating fiat currencies at the cost of the societies and the world. Believe in bitcoin, not just for personal gain, but for positive effect it could have on the world. Check out this guy's great post: http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1bhhjg/any_bitcoin_millionaires_here_on_reddit_if_so/c96rn3p
This method uses 'Mt. Gox' in conjunction with 'Bitinstant' which are both trusted sites. Double check that the Mt. Gox site you use has the https:// in the address bar.
Quickest method, using cash (you will own BTC in a few hours):
  1. Go to https://www.mtgox.com and make a new account. (you don't need to verify)
  2. Go to 'Funding Options' on the left and choose 'Bitinstant'.
  3. Copy the 'Exchange Account' number.
  4. Click on the 'Bitinstant' link on the bottom of the page.
  5. On the 'Bitinstant' page, there will be a drop down box where you can choose a location to make a cash deposit that will go into your Mt. Gox account. There are numerous places you can make cash deposits including: Walmart, CVS, Jewel/Osco, and Albertsons.
  6. After choosing the location to make a cash deposit, fill out the rest of the Bitinstant page, including a test or two to prove you are a human.
  7. Click next and after accepting the terms and conditions on the next page there will be a receipt that you need to print out and take to the store where you're making the cash deposit.
  8. Go to store, deposit, funds will pop up in your Mt. Gox account and you are free to trade! Yay!!
Slower method, setting up Dwolla for use with Mt. Gox (takes about 7 days to buy BTC):
  1. Sign up for dwolla at https://www.dwolla.com. Add you bank account information so that you can add funds to your account.
  2. It will take 2-4 business days to verify your bank account (Dwolla will deposit small transactions into your bank account and you will need to show how much they were), in the meantime sign up for a Mt. Gox account at https://www.mtgox.com
  3. Once your bank account is verified, you should fund your dwolla account, which will take about 3-4 business days for the funds to clear.
  4. Once they're cleared, go to Mt. Gox and click 'fund your account'.
  5. Follow steps '3' and '4' above.
  6. On the 'Bitinstant' site, choose 'dwolla' as the funding source.
  7. Follow the instructions on 'Bitinstant' and you will have money in your Mt. Gox account within minutes and are free to trade. Yay!!
Hopefully this guide has helped guide you through the process of buying bitcoin. It definitely has a bit of a learning curve, but I hope I could help. Now, for the long term, you'd want to verify your information on Mt. Gox so that you can make bank account deposits and without the percentage fee that Bitinstant charges, but that process can take a while, especially now that Bitcoin has increased in popularity. Also, once you have bitcoin, it is important to find a safe 'wallet' that you can keep your bitcoins in. There isn't a bank to protect your money for you, you have to be smart and responsible. There are always a lot of posts about good wallet services in /Bitcoin, make sure to choose one that is trusted.
submitted by andrewforlife to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/CryptoCurrency] Changelly scam... I think so.

The following post by Nttwo is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been openly removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ CryptoCurrency/comments/6u8tfh
The original post's content was as follows:
I've been very patient with Changelly since August 5th when I submitted my first support ticket on this matter. Now that it's clear to me that Changelly runs a drag-it-out support strategy, it's time to go public.
Is Changelly a scam?
You be the judge... please leave your opinion in the comments.
CONTEXT
The transaction (Tx) at issue here is BTC for GBYTE (Byteball).
For those not familiar with Byteball:
Byteball has no mining; its native currency - white bytes (GBYTE) and black bytes (BB) - was created back in December 2016 and has since been distributed, as widely as possible, via ~monthly airdrops. Every full moon since December, a "snapshot" has been taken of the balance of bytes held on each and every Byteball address, and of the balance of every registered BTC address. Shortly thereafter, each address receives new bytes based on the balance at the time of the snapshot.
The last snapshot was August 7, 2017 18:10 UTC (11:10 PDT), and new bytes were distributed as follows:
  • For every 1 GBYTE held on any Byteball address, you got 0.2 of new GBYTE
  • For every 1 GBYTE held on a linked Byteball address, you got 0.4222 of new BB
One last thing: Byteball's immutable ledger of Txs is stored in a construct called a DAG (Directed Acyclical Graph), analogous in function to bitcoin's blockchain.
WHAT HAPPENED?
On August 5, two days before the Byteball snapshot, I initiated a Tx with Changelly to trade 20 BTC for ~105 GBYTE. Changelly took my BTC, but held on to the GBYTE through the snapshot, collected the airdropped Byteball reward based on the balance of my funds, and then, 4 days after I initiated the Tx, sent ~105 GBYTE.
Changelly effectively stole my ByteBall distribution reward.
When hours had passed and still no GBYTE, I sent my first ticket, and support responded:
"It seems that there could be some technical issues either with our wallet or with Gbyte network. We will investigate the matter. We have forwarded your request to the technical department. They will push your transaction through. We will inform you, once your issue is resolved!"
On August 7th, before the snapshot, I submitted two more support tickets. I told Changelly that if they couldn't deliver the GBYTE before the snapshot, I wanted my BTC back. Support responded on August 8th 2:06pm (long after the snapshot):
"Unfortunately, we cannot refund your bitcoins since they have been already converted into GBYTE. But you will receive the same amount since your money has been already exchanged. Please confirm your GBYTE wallet address and we will repeat payout. All the issues seem to be fixed now, so it should work."
I responded, explaining why the only reasonable remedy was for Changelly to refund my BTC. I did not confirm any GBYTE wallet address.
Support ignored me and sent the following on August 9th:
"Good news! We have received the response from the exchange and now everything has been delivered!"
I wrote to Charlie Shrem, an advisor to Changelly, and he forwarded my complaint to Changelly CEO, Konstantin Gladych. I've also emailed Gladych many times directly myself. Zero response.
CIVIL LIABILITY
Under civil law, Changelly has been unjustly enriched and is liable to pay restitution.
Unjust Enrichment. A general equitable principle that no person should be allowed to profit at another's expense without making restitution for the reasonable value of any property, services, or other benefits that have been unfairly received and retained.
This principle is widely recognized and applies to Changelly here regardless of whether they did anything wrong. This is essentially why Coinbase and Poloniex changed course and gave their customers the BCH that was due to them.
CRIMINAL LIABILITY
Changelly is clearly liable under civil law.
What about criminal liability?
Using a DAG explorer, we can browse Byteball's immutable ledger of Txs and discover the following:
All Changelly had to do was send it to me. What happened?
The DAG shows that the GBYTE was diverted to the following addresses, which subsequently received the airdropped GBYTE that rightfully should have gone to me:
  • 31,447,997,156 to CBCYP2UY6YX2FJX6OXNDHBQO4VREDUJL
  • 51,788,023,285 to QAHP5Z4P6QQV4S3MUVTOJM5D7SJDWPSD
  • 21,763,859,830 to 6H5USZBXMOYUAGCYEYF7P3A6QU2EJBCT
  • 306,636,259 to QR542JXX7VJ5UJOZDKHTJCXAYWOATID2
The DAG also shows plenty of Tx activity over the relevant time period, also strongly suggesting no technical issues were to blame for Changelly's delayed Tx.
Did you know…?
Under the Czech Republic's Code on Corporate Criminal Liability both Changelly and the individual perpetrator(s) would be criminally liable.
WHAT NEXT
Changelly… fix this immediately.
Up next we’ll explore…
  • how to connect employee identities to the suspicious Byteball addresses
  • inner-workings of Changelly
  • the Bittrex and Changelly APIs
  • behind the scenes of the Changelly-Bittrex connection
  • Konstantin Gladych’s relationship with the European Cybercrime Center
  • presenting evidence to Czech and U.S. prosecutors
  • comments from devs re: Changelly’s technical excuses for failed Txs
  • similarities and differences between Changelly and BitInstant
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Haven't purchased in a few months since BitInstant dropped bank transfers. Decided to use Moneygram today and ran into nothing but issues. Experienced SR user here who needs a little help for once :).

First of all I know how annoying these kinds of questions are, but alas I find myself turning to my community for some support. I have been out of the country for about 3 months and just got back this December. I decide to make an SR purchase today and turns out BitInstant no longer accepts bank deposits. So, the only option I really had was to do a moneygram. I went through the normal steps (Wallet #, REAL name, tormail address, etc. etc.) and selected a moneygram location as well as giving them my tormail address one more time along with my phone number (for ZipZap). I don't have a car right now and my nearest moneygram location was like 2 miles so I hoofed it over there only to find out that my name was not on the account or that it had not even been set up or something of that nature (I honestly couldn't completely understand the call center rep on the red phone at CVS). I'm just trying to understand what I did wrong. I've been using bank deposits for like a year and they are flawless and go without a hitch every time. Also, has anyone else been having tormail issues? I did not receive a single confirmation email or anything throughout this whole period. I also just tried to sign up for coinbase and did not receive the confirmation email. Does tormail stop sending/receiving to your account after periods of inactivity?
Thanks guys.
:EDIT: - Just received an email from coinbase finally so I know my email is working. Does anyone have experience with this service and know if it is reliable? I saw it suggested by another SR reddit user. Thanks
:EDIT2: - I appreciate all the help yall. When I first started using SR, I went with a bitcoin vendor for my first or second time, and honestly, the fees are disgusting. There is a walmart about the same distance in the opposite direction that I am going to try. Hopefully they'll make it work. I sure am getting a workout today haha. Tip for anyone who is looking to buy a car, save up a couple extra paychecks and don't buy a beater cherokee for 1500 on craigslist hoping it will run forever. Because it will break down shortly thereafter. If you have my luck, that is.
:FINAL EDIT:: - Just wanted to say since there is a wells fargo directly across the street from me, I went with bitcopia because all they were accepting at the moment is wells fargo deposits anyway. The fee was not bad, probably equivalent to or less than bitinstant, and I had my BTC in about 2 hours directly to my silkroad wallet (which I never normally do, but I was feeling cheeky and pressed for time today). Went flawless, and the lack of information I had to give gave me the confidence to deposit directly to my SR wallet. I plan on using them again for sure.
Thanks everybody.
submitted by ChampionOfFriendship to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

100 grand floating around in an old Mt. Gox account, is there any way to recover it?

Hey Folks, so I have a bit of a problem. At some ambiguous point a year or two ago when BTC were at around $4 apiece I invested around 500 dollars and kept them in an mtgox account (dumb, yes, I know, I didn't feel like downloading the entire block chain for a wallet). I was browsing facebook yesterday and, lo and behold, I found out how hard they'd gone up, and my 100 or so bitcoins are now apparently worth a lot of money.
Now, the problem is that the account was set up with a tormail address, which is no longer operational, nor do I remember the password or username for the account, and the bitinstant receipt verifying my transaction was lost along with the email address.
So my question to you, /bitcoin: Am I completely boned here, or is there some way in which I can recover the account?
TL;DR was a big giant stupid idiot, may have fucked myself out of a lot of money through laziness
submitted by Throwaway896E to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

most efficient way to buy bitcoins?

i've been trying to figure out how to buy bitcoins, such as bitinstant and Mt.Gox, but I couldn't figure out how. I kinda understand bitinstant, but there's like a 20% transaction fee and that's way too much just to get bitcoins. Also, for Mt.Gox, i don't understand how i would transfer money to a different account.
is there a simple, easy, efficient way to buy bitcoins?
EDIT:
also, how do i send bitcoins to an address from wallets? (such as from reddit wallet)
submitted by KJKim to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

First time buying questions from a noob.

I have read a bunch of shit and I have a decent understanding of all of this, I just have a couple questions.
I am going to buy through Bitinstant because it's fast and seems to be the easiest. I want to do the cash deposit but I don't have a printer. Is there any way around this? Also, is Bitinstant good or would you recommend something else? I want to send it to my Mt. Gox account and I get that I just need the account number, but is Mt. Gox a wallet for me too and if so how to I find my Bitcoin Address?
Sorry for being stupid, I really did try to figure this stuff out but I couldn't :(
submitted by UlyssesSKrunk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

MtGox Transfer Error Cash to Wallet

Hey anyone know a resolution to this error. I have sent Bitinstant 4 emails no responses. Normally i get a response in an hour which is why im so confused
Transaction Details Fee $5.51 Origin Local Cash Deposit (700k Locations) Amt Paid $138.00 Origin Acct # N/A Amt Recieved $132.49 Destination Bitcoin Wallet Address Destination Acct # 1MqBYfvBPhfd4GANMzrdPZoSUQNoQ6QvE4 Event Log Date Event Type Event ID 07/06/13 15:54 New Order 6bcc45d5-808d-45bf-a6cc-43127286db45 07/06/13 15:54 MtGox transfer error 8b1fa3eb-34a2-41b3-b3d2-81943b6e8f4f 07/06/13 15:54 MtGox transfer error 3fe2372f-ecae-4547-b89a-8d1945227f0b 07/06/13 15:54 MtGox transfer error a0901ae2-4b13-4d4c-9d5d-147630040a1e 07/06/13 15:54 MtGox transfer error fa093ed4-da6b-44d1-b27e-21c82bdc7a51 07/06/13 15:54 MtGox transfer error 8865750a-36fd-4cc6-a43d-e9fa5a428dde 07/06/13 15:54 MtGox transfer error a740b167-778e-47b0-94c9-85a4c367acc5 07/06/13 15:54 MtGox transfer error 5a5a5dc6-af33-4d1d-8344-692aeb5fffd1 07/06/13 15:54 MtGox transfer error 02ba4db8-c3b7-44c4-84a2-5be9ec74adc0
The transfer errors continue about 20 mores time PLEASE HELP
submitted by azucker10 to Bitinstant [link] [comments]

Bitinstant order failed?

I recently (a few hours ago) made a purchase for some relatively small amount of BTC using dwolla to bitinstant. The bitinstant order failed with the error "Dwolla failed verification - unable to locate". However, the money I had in my Dwolla account is now gone (yes, I got an email verification from dwolla saying I sent money to BitInstant (EDP)) and there's no BTC in my wallet, there's also no activity on the bitcoin address.
I sent bitinstant an email immediately when the order failed and have yet to receive a reply. How long do I wait before I just give up, or is there anything I can do with dwolla to get my money back? Is this something that can be resolved soon?
submitted by zerosp4c3 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A New Adopter's Wretched Bitcoin Experience and Subsequent Assurance that Bitcoin Will Fail...

So I finally decided to take the plunge with Bitcoin this week. For reference, I live in the D.C. metro area, so using Moneygram via Bitinstant seemed the most convienent option for me since they had so many locations available to deposit money.
That wasn't quite accurate, as it would turn out.
I started the evening after class by going to a CVS near my house that was listed in the ZipZap payment slip as an accepting location. After finding the ubiqitous red phone. I end up talking to an inevitable South Asian person with limited actual grasp of English, who asks for what I considered to be a lot of information (full name, telephone number, address). However, his English was so shitty to the point of my having to yell the spelling of my address phonetically because the word "H*****" is apparently too complicated for the subcontinent. Okay, minor irritation...time to pay the cashier. The cashier attempts to load the transaction on her register; fortunately she's not interested in carding me or anything, so I take that as a good sign for maintaining some semblance of anonymity. But the transaction never loads, the system is down!
Oh well, on to the next store. This was a pretty big CVS for the area, and I assumed that if their system didn't work, the systems at smaller stores would be dodgy anyway. It's already approaching 10 p.m. and all the CVS's are closing, leaving only 7-Eleven stores with VCom ATM machines as my next option. I drive to the nearest one, select "Moneygram", which gives me a prompt telling me to call Moneygram's 800 number and to give them the five digit terminal address for the transaction. I go through the rigamarole of spelling out my name and address for the error-prone South Asian phone tech yet again, even though I'm conducting the very same transaction I'd called in not even 15 minutes prior. I finally finish with the 800 number call, and proceed on the machine through it's options to ExpressPay a bill to ZipZap. Everything seems in order, I select the amount of money to send, insert my debit card, type in my PIN, and I think I'm good to go. But no, the machine cancels my transaction, saying it cannot be completed at this time. I call the 800 number yet again, getting the customer support service. They tell me the machine in my location isn't working (no shit), so they point me to another 7-Eleven a few miles away, assuring me it would work.
It didn't. I didn't even make it past the introductory screens before a technician lackadasically told me that the 7-Eleven to which I'd been directed by the previous technician was not a working Moneygram location, even though they had the VCom ATM and all. At this point, I lose it, and demand to speak to someone in charge. I demand to be directed to a location where they can verify the service is actualy working, which I'm told they cannot do for some reason. I'm instead given a list of locations I've already been to, or CVS's that are already closed for the evening, none of their suggestions proving the least bit helpful.
This has proven a horribly frustrating experience...but I was doggedly determined to see it through before going home, so I looked up locations myself on the zipzap website and saw that a 24-hour Walmart about 30 minutes away did Moneygram transactions. A 30 minute drive isn't exactly "convenience", especially after the ordeal I'd already been through. Walmart was also very particular about personal information: they wanted name, phone number, address, email! and requested my driver's license for verification...that was a bit of an unpleasant suprise, but since I'm not doing anything illegal with my Bitcoins, I didn't care.
To Walmart's credit, my transaction went through by the time I made it back to the parking lot (about 10 minutes). It was easy enough to transfer Bitcoins from my wallet to various other wallets from my computer. However, I tried to consolidate a bunch of Bitcoins into one wallet...although my Bitcoin software says the send transactions were completed and verified, my final account balance was half of what I thought it would be and I don't understand why. We're talking about $100 worth of Bitcoins that never showed up.
So, tl;dr - Bitinstant/Moneygram/ZipZap is horribly broken and only works at certain locations, their customer service is worthless, anonymity is pretty much impossible to maintain because everyone asks for your information, and a random amount of paid-for Bitcoins might not ever show up in a wallet you sent them to because...electrons? I don't know, but what I do know is that this is not a convienient, sustainable, or efficient way of doing business and if Bitinstant is one of the larger exchanges due to it's "convenience", then God help Bitcoin...
submitted by McGumpin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I tried buying bitcoins, but I'm afraid I made a mistake.

Hello, /bitcoin. I tried today to buy a small amount of bitcoins in an address that I made on blockchain. I made an account on bitinstant, and copy-pasted my wallet address from blockchain into the destination address on bitinstant and dropped off some cash at Wal-Mart.
The thing that confuses me is that when I look at the transactions screen on bitinstant, the destination acct # is not the same as my blockchain wallet address and my balance is 0.00BTC.
Is this normal? Or did something go wrong?
I might add that I am somewhat new at this and still trying to learn how the system works. Thanks for any help you might be.
Edit: problem solved thanks to Vycid. It was a strange brain fart on my part. I searched through my email and found an old confirmation from a looong time ago from blockchain wallet that I forgot I made (in my Firefox browser) when I first read about bitcoin and hadn't though about really trying it. Today, my friend was on my computer and left a Firefox browser open, but I made my blockchain wallet in Chrome. I completely didn't think about that, and I didn't notice that the identifier field (populated from old cookies, I guess) was different. I logged into bitinstant, and copy-pasted. When I got home later, I opened Chrome, logged into the wallet with the identifier that pops up in Chrome, and logged in, thinking it was the same wallet.
submitted by FMDub to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I'm new to Bitcoin, I have a couple questions.

I purchased 60 BTC last week through bitinstant/coinbase for investment and speculative trading purposes. I have a couple questions regarding the security of my coins.
1.I transferred all my coins to a blockchain.info wallet. Are my coins going to be secure if I leave them here? Is it safe for me to frequently trade in and out of this account for various things? I don't really want to create a "paper wallet" unless that is something that is deemed necessary for security by the community.
2.When people talk about "backing up" their wallet, is this simply done by making a copy of your wallet address and password, then storing it somewhere safely? I wrote down all the relevant data related to my account. Is that all I need to do?
3.I will be playing btc poker at sealswithclubs.eu . I noticed they have a browser based client, and not a stand alone client for their gaming. How secure is playing on a site like this going to be? I feel a little uneasy regarding the security of my btc on this site.
Any general tips or tricks are welcome too. Thanks, i'm excited to join the bitcoin world!
submitted by SRPlab to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

*Facepalm* Newb Bitinstant Quick Question

First time with bitcoins. Head about bitinstant and after doing some research seems like the most painless way to get BTC as I can just walk to the bank and do it.
I go to their website, select: Pay from Major Bank Branch To: Bitcoin to email (coinapult)
The site asks for my "Destination Account", "Amount to Send", and "Notification Email".
(embarassed to ask this question) What am I supposed to put down for my Destination account? My bitcoin wallet address the stand alone program? My instawallet address I plan on depositing the coins into after I get the email?
Thanks for helping me out!
submitted by sw33tn3ss to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Coinbase – How to find your Bitcoin Wallet address 2020 ... Why Your Bitcoin Wallet Address Changes Every Time? - YouTube Where Is Cash App Bitcoin Wallet Address? 🔴 - YouTube HOW TO CREATE BITCORE COIN WALLET ADDRESS AND LINK How To Create a Bitcoin Address and Paper Wallet

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Coinbase – How to find your Bitcoin Wallet address 2020 ...

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