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Welcome to /onions! What do you want to know?
Have a lot of questions? Read our wiki first
To get started using Tor, first download and run the Tor Browser Bundle: https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en
Then, try some of the links in the sidebar and explore!
submitted by AutoModerator to onions [link] [comments]

FATF recommends considering privacy coin and unhosted wallet as red flag.

https://www.fatf-gafi.org/publications/fatfrecommendations/documents/virtual-assets-red-flag-indicators.html
Red Flag Indicators Related to Anonymity
  1. This set of indicators draws from the inherent characteristics and vulnerabilities associated with the underlying technology of VAs. The various technological features below increase anonymity and add hurdles to the detection of criminal activity by LEAs. These factors make VAs attractive to criminals looking to disguise or store their funds. Nevertheless, the mere presence of these features in an activity does not automatically suggest an illicit transaction. For example, the use of a hardware or paper wallet may be legitimate as a way to secure VAs against thefts. Again, the presence of these indicators should be considered in the context of other characteristics about the customer and relationship, or a logical business explanation.
 Transactions by a customer involving more than one type of VA, despite additional transaction fees, and especially those VAs that provide higher anonymity, such as anonymity-enhanced cryptocurrency (AEC) or privacy coins.
 Moving a VA that operates on a public, transparent blockchain, such as Bitcoin, to a centralised exchange and then immediately trading it for an AEC or privacy coin.
 Customers that operate as an unregistered/unlicensed VASP on peer-to-peer (P2P) exchange websites, particularly when there are concerns that the customers handle huge amount of VA transfers on its customer’s behalf, and charge higher fees to its customer than transmission services offered by other exchanges. Use of bank accounts to facilitate these P2P transactions.
 Abnormal transactional activity (level and volume) of VAs cashed out at exchanges from P2P platform-associated wallets with no logical business explanation.
 VAs transferred to or from wallets that show previous patterns of activity associated with the use of VASPs that operate mixing or tumbling services or P2P platforms.
 Transactions making use of mixing and tumbling services, suggesting an intent to obscure the flow of illicit funds between known wallet addresses and darknet marketplaces.
 Funds deposited or withdrawn from a VA address or wallet with direct and indirect exposure links to known suspicious sources, including darknet marketplaces, mixing/tumbling services, questionable gambling sites, illegal activities (e.g. ransomware) and/or theft reports.
 The use of decentralised/unhosted, hardware or paper wallets to transport VAs across borders.
 Users entering the VASP platform having registered their Internet domain names through proxies or using domain name registrars (DNS) that suppress or redact the owners of the domain names.
 Users entering the VASP platform using an IP address associated with a darknet or other similar software that allows anonymous communication, including encrypted emails and VPNs. Transactions between partners using various anonymous encrypted communication means (e.g. forums, chats, mobile applications, online games, etc.) instead of a VASP.
 A large number of seemingly unrelated VA wallets controlled from the same IP-address (or MAC-address), which may involve the use of shell wallets registered to different users to conceal their relation to each other.
 Use of VAs whose design is not adequately documented, or that are linked to possible fraud or other tools aimed at implementing fraudulent schemes, such as Ponzi schemes.
 Receiving funds from or sending funds to VASPs whose CDD or know-your- customer (KYC) processes are demonstrably weak or non-existent.
 Using VA ATMs/kiosks – o despite the higher transaction fees and including those commonly used by mules or scam victims; or o in high-risk locations where increased criminal activities occur. A single use of an ATM/kiosk is not enough in and of itself to constitute a red flag, but would if it was coupled with the machine being in a high-risk area, or was used for repeated small transactions (or other additional factors).
submitted by subarun7 to Monero [link] [comments]

Earn USD [Paypal] or BTC with the following sites

Well, I've created this guide so I can share tips on how to earn some money. I'll detail some sites from my own experience.
  1. ySense non-ref
    • Description: Site where you can do some random tasks, such as completing surveys or installing apps.
    • Payment method: Paypal, Payoneer, etc.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  2. HoneyGain non-ref:
    • Description: Platform that uses your devices as a proxy and pays you.
    • Payment method: Paypal.
    • Pros: You don't have to do anything, it's a passive income and you only have to worry about having the app running if you have the PC turned on.
    • Cons: After trying it for 5 days I'd say you make about $4 USD a month.
    • Tips: The best thing is to have a computer per network, also you should try to maximize the amount of time running the app, this can be done using this trick so that when you start Windows, HoneyGain automatically runs.
    • Referral: If you use this referral link you can earn $5 USD.
  3. PacketStream non-ref:
    • Description: Basically it's the same as HoneyGain.
    • Payment method: Paypal.
    • Pros: You don't have to do anything, it's a passive income and you only have to worry about having the app running if you have the PC turned on.
    • Tips: Same as HoneyGain.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  4. Testable minds non-ref:
    • Description: Platform where you get paid to answer surveys.
    • Payment method: Paypal (proof).
    • Pros: You get paid a decent amount for each survey.
    • Cons: There are very, very few surveys.
    • Tips: I could only enable notification using Google Chrome browser, but even then I encounter very, very few surveys.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  5. adBTC non-ref:
    • Description: Site where you can earn BTC by visiting websites.
    • Payment method: Bitcoins.
    • Reference: If you want to create an account use this link please.
  6. 2captcha non-ref:
    • Description: Site where you can solve captchas for money.
    • Payment method: Payeer, Bitcoins, etc.
    • Pros: The requirement to get money (Payout) very low, for some payment methods $0.5 USD, for other $1 USD.
    • Cons: The payment per captcha is very very low.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  7. Gamehag:
    • Description: Platform where you can perfom random tasks like play games, write articles, etc.
    • Payment method: Visa Prepaid Cards, Steam Wallets, etc.
    • Pros: There are a lot of tasks.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this referral link please.
submitted by dayasrichard to beermoneyindia [link] [comments]

Earn USD [Paypal] or BTC with the following sites

Well, I've created this guide so I can share tips on how to earn some money. I'll detail some sites from my own experience.
  1. ySense non-ref
    • Description: Site where you can do some random tasks, such as completing surveys or installing apps.
    • Payment method: Paypal, Payoneer, etc.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  2. HoneyGain non-ref:
    • Description: Platform that uses your devices as a proxy and pays you.
    • Payment method: Paypal.
    • Pros: You don't have to do anything, it's a passive income and you only have to worry about having the app running if you have the PC turned on.
    • Cons: After trying it for 5 days I'd say you make about $4 USD a month.
    • Tips: The best thing is to have a computer per network, also you should try to maximize the amount of time running the app, this can be done using this trick so that when you start Windows, HoneyGain automatically runs.
    • Referral: If you use this referral link you can earn $5 USD.
  3. PacketStream non-ref:
    • Description: Basically it's the same as HoneyGain.
    • Payment method: Paypal.
    • Pros: You don't have to do anything, it's a passive income and you only have to worry about having the app running if you have the PC turned on.
    • Tips: Same as HoneyGain.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  4. Testable minds non-ref:
    • Description: Platform where you get paid to answer surveys.
    • Payment method: Paypal (proof).
    • Pros: You get paid a decent amount for each survey.
    • Cons: There are very, very few surveys.
    • Tips: I could only enable notification using Google Chrome browser, but even then I encounter very, very few surveys.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  5. adBTC non-ref:
    • Description: Site where you can earn BTC by visiting websites.
    • Payment method: Bitcoins.
    • Reference: If you want to create an account use this link please.
  6. 2captcha non-ref:
    • Description: Site where you can solve captchas for money.
    • Payment method: Payeer, Bitcoins, etc.
    • Pros: The requirement to get money (Payout) very low, for some payment methods $0.5 USD, for other $1 USD.
    • Cons: The payment per captcha is very very low.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  7. Gamehag:
    • Description: Platform where you can perfom random tasks like play games, write articles, etc.
    • Payment method: Visa Prepaid Cards, Steam Wallets, etc.
    • Pros: There are a lot of tasks.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this referral link please.
submitted by dayasrichard to beermoneyph [link] [comments]

Earn USD [Paypal] or BTC with the following sites

Well, I've created this guide so I can share tips on how to earn some money. I'll detail some sites from my own experience.
  1. ySense non-ref
    • Description: Site where you can do some random tasks, such as completing surveys or installing apps.
    • Payment method: Paypal, Payoneer, etc.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  2. HoneyGain non-ref:
    • Description: Platform that uses your devices as a proxy and pays you.
    • Payment method: Paypal.
    • Pros: You don't have to do anything, it's a passive income and you only have to worry about having the app running if you have the PC turned on.
    • Cons: After trying it for 5 days I'd say you make about $4 USD a month.
    • Tips: The best thing is to have a computer per network, also you should try to maximize the amount of time running the app, this can be done using this trick so that when you start Windows, HoneyGain automatically runs.
    • Referral: If you use this referral link you can earn $5 USD.
  3. PacketStream non-ref:
    • Description: Basically it's the same as HoneyGain.
    • Payment method: Paypal.
    • Pros: You don't have to do anything, it's a passive income and you only have to worry about having the app running if you have the PC turned on.
    • Tips: Same as HoneyGain.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  4. Testable minds non-ref:
    • Description: Platform where you get paid to answer surveys.
    • Payment method: Paypal (proof).
    • Pros: You get paid a decent amount for each survey.
    • Cons: There are very, very few surveys.
    • Tips: I could only enable notification using Google Chrome browser, but even then I encounter very, very few surveys.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  5. adBTC non-ref:
    • Description: Site where you can earn BTC by visiting websites.
    • Payment method: Bitcoins.
    • Reference: If you want to create an account use this link please.
  6. 2captcha non-ref:
    • Description: Site where you can solve captchas for money.
    • Payment method: Payeer, Bitcoins, etc.
    • Pros: The requirement to get money (Payout) very low, for some payment methods $0.5 USD, for other $1 USD.
    • Cons: The payment per captcha is very very low.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  7. Gamehag:
    • Description: Platform where you can perfom random tasks like play games, write articles, etc.
    • Payment method: Visa Prepaid Cards, Steam Wallets, etc.
    • Pros: There are a lot of tasks.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this referral link please.
submitted by dayasrichard to beermoneyAus [link] [comments]

Earn USD [Paypal] or BTC with the following sites

Well, I've created this guide so I can share tips on how to earn some money. I'll detail some sites from my own experience.
  1. ySense non-ref
    • Description: Site where you can do some random tasks, such as completing surveys or installing apps.
    • Payment method: Paypal, Payoneer, etc.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  2. HoneyGain non-ref:
    • Description: Platform that uses your devices as a proxy and pays you.
    • Payment method: Paypal.
    • Pros: You don't have to do anything, it's a passive income and you only have to worry about having the app running if you have the PC turned on.
    • Cons: After trying it for 5 days I'd say you make about $4 USD a month.
    • Tips: The best thing is to have a computer per network, also you should try to maximize the amount of time running the app, this can be done using this trick so that when you start Windows, HoneyGain automatically runs.
    • Referral: If you use this referral link you can earn $5 USD.
  3. PacketStream non-ref:
    • Description: Basically it's the same as HoneyGain.
    • Payment method: Paypal.
    • Pros: You don't have to do anything, it's a passive income and you only have to worry about having the app running if you have the PC turned on.
    • Tips: Same as HoneyGain.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  4. Testable minds non-ref:
    • Description: Platform where you get paid to answer surveys.
    • Payment method: Paypal (proof).
    • Pros: You get paid a decent amount for each survey.
    • Cons: There are very, very few surveys.
    • Tips: I could only enable notification using Google Chrome browser, but even then I encounter very, very few surveys.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  5. adBTC non-ref:
    • Description: Site where you can earn BTC by visiting websites.
    • Payment method: Bitcoins.
    • Reference: If you want to create an account use this link please.
  6. 2captcha non-ref:
    • Description: Site where you can solve captchas for money.
    • Payment method: Payeer, Bitcoins, etc.
    • Pros: The requirement to get money (Payout) very low, for some payment methods $0.5 USD, for other $1 USD.
    • Cons: The payment per captcha is very very low.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this link with referral please.
  7. Gamehag:
    • Description: Platform where you can perfom random tasks like play games, write articles, etc.
    • Payment method: Visa Prepaid Cards, Steam Wallets, etc.
    • Pros: There are a lot of tasks.
    • Referral: If you want to create an account use this referral link please.
submitted by dayasrichard to beermoneyasia [link] [comments]

A few stories about Brian Krebs: The independent cybercrime journalist who exposes criminals on the internet

First, a bit of introduction before we get into the living drama that is Brian Krebs.
Brian Krebs has been a journalist for decades, starting in the late 90s. He got his start at The Washington Post, but what he's most famous for are his exposes on criminal businesses and individuals who perpetuate cyber crime worldwide. In 2001, he got his interest in cybercrime piqued when a computer worm locked him out of his own computer. In 2005, he shifted from working as a staff writer at The Washington Post's tech newswire to writing for their security blog, "Security Wire". During his tenure there, he started by focusing on the victims of cybercrime, but later also started to focus on the perpetrators of it as well. His reporting helped lead to the shutdown of McColo, a hosting provider who provided service to some of the world's biggest spammers and hackers. Reports analyzing the shutdown of McColo estimated that global spam volume dropped by between 40 and 70 percent. Further analysis revealed it also played host to child pornography sites, and the Russian Business Network, a major Russian cybercrime ring.
In 2009, Krebs left to start his own site, KrebsOnSecurity. Since then, he's been credited with being the first to report on major events such as Stuxnet and when Target was breached, resulting in the leakage of 40 million cards. He also regularly investigates and reveals criminals' identities on his site. The latter has made him the bane of the world of cybercrime, as well as basically a meme, where criminals will include references like Made by Brian Krebs in their code, or name their shops full of stolen credit cards after him.
One of his first posts on his new site was a selection of his best work. While not particularly dramatic, they serve as an excellent example of dogged investigative work, and his series reveal the trail of takedowns his work has documented, or even contributed to.
And now, a selection of drama involving Krebs. Note, all posts are sarcastically-tinged retellings of the source material which I will link throughout. I also didn't use the real names in my retellings, but they are in the source material. This took way too long to write, and it still does massively condense the events described in the series. Krebs has been involved with feuds with other figures, but I'd argue these tales are the "main" bits of drama that are most suited for here.

Fly on the Wall

By 2013, Krebs was no stranger to cybercriminals taking the fight to the real world. He was swatted previously to the point where the police actually know to give him a ring and see if there'd actually been a murder, or if it was just those wacky hackers at it again. In addition, his identity was basically common knowledge to cybercriminals, who would open lines of credit in his name, or find ways to send him money using stolen credit cards.
However, one particular campaign against him caught his eye. A hacker known as "Fly" aka "Flycracker" aka "MUXACC1" posted on a Russian-language fraud forum he administered about a "Krebs fund". His plan was simple. Raise Bitcoin to buy Heroin off of a darknet marketplace, address it to Krebs, and alert his local police via a spoofed phone call. Now, because Krebs is an investigative journalist, he develops undercover presences on cybercrime forums, and it just so happened he'd built up a presence on this one already.
Guys, it became known recently that Brian Krebs is a heroin addict and he desperately needs the smack, so we have started the "Helping Brian Fund", and shortly we will create a bitcoin wallet called "Drugs for Krebs" which we will use to buy him the purest heroin on the Silk Road. My friends, his withdrawal is very bad, let’s join forces to help the guy! We will save Brian from the acute heroin withdrawal and the world will get slightly better!
Fly had first caught Krebs' attention by taunting him on Twitter, sending him Tweets including insults and abuse, and totally-legit looking links. Probably either laced with malware, or designed to get Krebs' IP. He also took to posting personal details such as Krebs' credit report, directions to his house, and pictures of his front door on LiveJournal, of all places.
So, after spotting the scheme, he alerted his local police that he'd probably have someone sending him some China White. Sure enough, the ne'er-do-wells managed to raise 2 BTC, which at the time was a cool $200 or so. They created an account on the premiere darknet site at the time, The Silk Road under the foolproof name "briankrebs7". They found one seller who had consistently high reviews, but the deal fell through for unknown reasons. My personal theory is the seller decided to Google where it was going, and realized sending a gram of dope into the waiting arms of local law enforcement probably wasn't the best use of his time. Still, the forum members persevered, and found another seller who was running a buy 10 get 2 free promotion. $165 of Bitcoin later, the drugs were on their way to a new home. The seller apparently informed Fly that the shipment should arrive by Tuesday, a fact which he gleefully shared with the forum.
While our intrepid hero had no doubt that the forum members were determined to help him grab the tail of the dragon, he's not one to assume without confirmation, and enlisted the help of a graduate student at UCSD who was researching Bitcoin and anonymity on The Silk Road, and confirmed the address shared by Fly was used to deposit 2 BTC into an account known to be used for money management on the site.
By Monday, an envelope from Chicago had arrived, containing a copy of Chicago confidential. Taped inside were tiny baggies filled with the purported heroin. Either dedicated to satisfied customers, or mathematically challenged, the seller had included thirteen baggies instead of the twelve advertised. A police officer arrived to take a report and whisked the baggies away.
Now, Fly was upset that Krebs wasn't in handcuffs for drug possession, and decided to follow up his stunt by sending Krebs a floral arrangement shaped like a cross, and an accompanying threatening message addressed to his wife, the dire tone slightly undercut by the fact that it was signed "Velvet Crabs". Krebs' curiosity was already piqued from the shenanigans with the heroin, but with the arrival of the flowers decided to dive deeper into the сука behind things.
He began digging into databases from carding sites that had been hacked, but got his first major breakthrough to his identity from a Russian computer forensics firm. Fly had maintained an account on a now-defunct hacking forum, whose database was breached under "Flycracker". It turns out, the email Flycracker had used was also hacked at some point, and a source told Krebs that the email was full of reports from a keylogger Fly had installed on his wife's computer. Now, because presumably his wife wasn't part of, or perhaps even privy to her husband's illicit dealings, her email account happened to be her full legal name, which Krebs was able to trace to her husband. Now, around this time, the site Fly maintained disappeared from the web, and administrators on another major fraud forum started purging his account. This is a step they typically take when they suspect a member has been apprehended by authorities. Nobody knew for sure, but they didn't want to take any chances.
More research by Krebs revealed that the criminals' intuition had been correct, and Fly was arrested in Italy, carrying documents under an assumed name. He was sitting in an Italian jail, awaiting potential extradition to the United States, as well as potentially facing charges in Italy. This was relayed to Krebs by a law enforcement official who simply said "The Fly has been swatted". (Presumably while slowly removing a pair of aviator sunglasses)
While Fly may have been put away, the story between Krebs and Fly wasn't quite over. He did end up being extradited to the US for prosecution, but while imprisoned in Italy, Fly actually started sending Krebs letters. Understandably distrustful after the whole "heroin" thing, his contacts in federal law enforcement tested the letter, and found it to be clean. Inside, there was a heartfelt and personal letter, apologizing for fucking with Krebs in so many ways. He also forgave Krebs for posting his identity online, leading him to muse that perhaps Fly was working through a twelve-step program. In December, he received another letter, this time a simple postcard with a cheerful message wishing him a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Krebs concluded his post thusly:
Cybercrooks have done some pretty crazy stuff to me in response to my reporting about them. But I don’t normally get this kind of closure. I look forward to meeting with Fly in person one day soon now that he will be just a short train ride away. And he may be here for some time: If convicted on all charges, Fly faces up to 30 years in U.S. federal prison.
Fly ultimately was extradited. He plead guilty and was sentenced to 41 months in jail

vDOS and Mirai Break The Internet

Criminals are none too happy when they find their businesses and identities on the front page of KrebsOnSecurity. It usually means law enforcement isn't far behind. One such business was known as vDOS. A DDOS-for-hire (also known as a "booter" or a "stresser") site that found itself hacked, with all their customer records still in their databases leaked. Analysis of the records found that in a four-month time span, the service had been responsible for about 8.81 years worth of attack time, meaning on average at any given second, there were 26 simultaneous attacks running. Interestingly, the hack of vDOS came about from another DDOS-for-hire site, who as it turns out was simply reselling services provided by vDOS. They were far from the only one. vDOS appeared to provide firepower to a large number of different resellers.
In addition to the attack logs, support messages were also among the data stolen. This contained some complaints from various clients who complained they were unable to launch attacks against Israeli IPs. This is a common tactic by hackers to try and avoid unwanted attention from authorities in their country of residence. This was confirmed when two men from Israel were arrested for their involvement in owning and running vDOS. However, this was just the beginning for this bit of drama.
The two men arrested went by the handles "applej4ck" and "Raziel". They had recently published a paper on DDOS attack methods in an online Israeli security magazine. Interestingly, on the same day the men were arrested, questioned, and released on bail, vDOS went offline. Not because it had been taken down by Israeli authorities, not because they had shut it down themselves, but because a DDOS protection firm, BackConnect Security, had hijacked the IP addresses belonging to the company. To spare a lot of technical detail, it's called a BGP hijack, and it basically works by a company saying "Yeah, those are our addresses." It's kind of amazing how much of the internet is basically just secured by the digital equivalent of pinky swears. You can read some more technical detail on Wikipedia. Anyway, we'll get back to BackConnect.
Following the publication of the story uncovering the inner workings of vDOS, KrebsOnSecurity was hit with a record breaking DDOS attack, that peaked at 620/Gbps, nearly double the most powerful DDOS attack previously on record. To put that in perspective, that's enough bandwidth to download 5 simultaneous copies of Interstellar in 4K resolution every single second, and still have room to spare. The attack was so devastating, Akamai, one of the largest providers of DDOS protection in the world had to drop Krebs as a pro bono client. Luckily, Google was willing to step in and place his site under the protection of Google's Project Shield, a free service designed to protect the news sites and journalists from being knocked offline by DDOS attacks.
This attack was apparently in retaliation for the vDOS story, since some of the data sent in the attack included the string "freeapplej4ck". The attack was executed by a botnet of Internet of Things (or IoT) devices. These are those "smart" devices like camera systems, routers, DVRs. Basically things that connect to the cloud. An astounding amount of those are secured with default passwords that can be easily looked up from various sites or even the manufacturers' websites. This was the start of a discovery of a massive botnet that had been growing for years.
Now time for a couple quick side stories:
Dyn, a company who provides DNS to many major companies including Twitter, Reddit, and others came under attack, leaving many sites (including Twitter and Reddit) faltering in the wake of it. Potentially due to one of their engineers' collaboration with Krebs on another story. It turned out that the same botnet that attacked Krebs' site was at least part of the attack on Dyn
And back to BackConnect, that DDOS protection firm that hijacked the IP addresses from vDOS. Well it turns out BGP Hijacks are old hat for the company. They had done it at least 17 times before. Including at least once (purportedly with permission) for the address 1.3.3.7. Aka, "leet". It turns out one of the co-founders of BackConnect actually posted screenshots of him visiting sites that tell you your public IP address in a DDOS mitigation industry chat, showing it as 1.3.3.7. They also used a BGP Hijack against a hosting company and tried to frame a rival DDOS mitigation provider.
Finally, another provider, Datawagon was interestingly implicated in hosting DDOS-for-hire sites while offering DDOS protection. In a Skype conversation where the founder of Datawagon wanted to talk about that time he registered dominos.pizza and got sued for it, he brings up scanning the internet for vulnerable routers completely unprompted. Following the publication of the story about BackConnect, in which he was included in, he was incensed about his portrayal, and argued with Krebs over Skype before Krebs ultimately ended up blocking him. He was subsequently flooded with fake contact requests from bogus or hacked Skype accounts. Shortly thereafter, the record-breaking DDOS attack rained down upon his site.
Back to the main tale!
So, it turns out the botnet of IoT devices was puppeteered by a malware called Mirai. How did it get its name? Well, that's the name its creator gave it, after an anime called Mirai Nikki. How did this name come to light? The creator posted the source code online. (The name part, not the origin. The origin didn't come 'til later.) The post purported that they'd picked it up from somewhere in their travels as a DDOS industry professional. It turns out this is a semi-common tactic when miscreants fear that law enforcement might come looking for them, and having the only copy of the source code of a malware in existence is a pretty strong indicator that you have something to do with it. So, releasing the source to the world gives a veneer of plausible deniability should that eventuality come to pass. So who was this mysterious benefactor of malware source? They went by the name "Anna-senpai".
As research on the Mirai botnet grew, and more malware authors incorporated parts of Mirai's source code into their own attacks, attention on the botnet increased, and on the people behind it. The attention was presumably the reason why Hackforums, the forum where the source code was posted, later disallowed ostensible "Server Stress Tester" services from being sold on it. By December, "Operation Tarpit" had wrought 34 arrests and over a hundred "knock and talk" interviews questioning people about their involvement.
By January, things started to come crashing down. Krebs published an extensive exposé on Anna-senpai detailing all the evidence linking them to the creation of Mirai. The post was so big, he included a damn glossary. What sparked the largest botnet the internet had ever seen? Minecraft. Minecraft servers are big business. A popular one can earn tens of thousands of dollars per month from people buying powers, building space, or other things. It's also a fiercely competitive business, with hundreds of servers vying for players. It turns out that things may have started, as with another set of companies, two rival DDOS mitigation providers competing for customers. ProTraf was a provider of such mitigation technology, and a company whose owner later worked for ProTraf had on at least one occasion hijacked addresses belonging to another company, ProxyPipe. ProxyPipe had also been hit with DDOS attacks they suspected to be launched by ProTraf.
While looking into the President of ProTraf, Krebs realized he'd seen the relatively uncommon combination of programming languages and skills posted by the President somewhere else. They were shared by Anna-senpai on Hackforums. As Krebs dug deeper and deeper into Anna-senpai's online presence, he uncovered other usernames, including one he traced to some Minecraft forums where a photoshopped picture of a still from Pulp Fiction contained the faces of BackConnect, which was a rival to ProTraf's DDOS mitigation business, and another face. A hacker by the name of Vyp0r, who another employee of ProTraf claimed betrayed his trust and blackmailed him into posting the source of another piece of malware called Bashlite. There was also a third character photoshopped into the image. An anime character named "Yamada" from a movie called B Gata H Hei.
Interestingly, under the same username, Krebs found a "MyAnimeList" profile which, out of 9 titles it had marked as watched, were B Gata H Hei, as well as Mirai Nikki, the show from which Mirai derived its name. It continues on with other evidence, including DDOS attacks against Rutgers University, but in short, there was little doubt in the identity of "Anna-senpai", but the person behind the identity did contact Krebs to comment. He denied any involvement in Mirai or DDOS attacks.
"I don’t think there are enough facts to definitively point the finger at me," [Anna-senpai] said. "Besides this article, I was pretty much a nobody. No history of doing this kind of stuff, nothing that points to any kind of sociopathic behavior. Which is what the author is, a sociopath."
He did, however, correct Krebs on the name of B Gata H Kei.
Epilogue
Needless to say, the Mirai botnet crew was caught, but managed to avoid jailtime thanks to their cooperation with the government. That's not to say they went unpunished. Anna-senpai was sentenced to 6 months confinement, 2500 hours of community service, and they may have to pay up to $8.6 million in restitution for their attacks on Rutgers university.

Other Stories

I don't have the time or energy to write another effortpost, and as is I'm over 20,000 characters, so here's a few other tidbits of Krebs' clashes with miscreants.
submitted by HereComesMyDingDong to internetdrama [link] [comments]

Just got to say. Satoshi Dice is super fun.

Satoshi dice is a simple gambling website that used to work on the bitcoin chain but high fees made its business model not work so it switched to bitcoin cash. It also works with the bitcoin.com wallet pretty nicely. If you're in america you'll need to use a proxy to visit the site. https://www.satoshidice.com/
submitted by MeepJingles to btc [link] [comments]

Logs of yesterday's dev meeting

 Dev meeting?  Would say so, yes  The people are still exhausted from the payment ID meeting :)  Guess we could ping some people  vtnerd, moneromooo, hyc, gingeropolous, TheCharlatan, sarang, suraeNoether, jtgrassie  Anyone up for a meeting?  Yep I'm here  Here  o/  Perhaps we should just start and people will eventually hop in?   oof   sorry guys, I'm working on the new FFS and I forgot all about this. Got a couple of new volunteers.   This literally might be able to launch tomorrow.  I know that. It's called "flow" :)  I could run if you're out of time?   go for it dEBRUYNE   you guys are going to like this new FFS. We're like 99% done.  Hi  rehrar: someone else do the milestone thing already?  All right, jtgrassie, perhaps you'd to start w/ briefly describing your most recent PR? https://github.com/monero-project/monero/pull/5091   oneiric, xiphon did everything   like....everything  As far as I can see, it allows the user to push his transaction over I2P, thereby masking the origin IP of the sendeuser  great  And it hooks into vtnerd's PR right?  Sure. It basically just builds on vtnerds Tor stuff.  sorry dEBRUYNE  Really not much added.  I have it running and tested.  From the perspective of the user, what needs to be configured exactly?  Nice  Assuming the PR is included in the release binaries  I'm using knacccs i2p-zero duirng testing but will of course work with any i2p setup   sorry dEBRUYNE <= Np  Looks a little like dams breaking, now that we have some dark clouds over Kovri and people take matters into their own hands ...  User needs to run i2p, expose a socks service and and inbound tunnel.  Basically same as Tor  Okay, so should be reasonable as long as we write proper documentation for it (e.g. an elaborate guide)  rbrunner, yes, knaccc credit for jumping on i2p-zero really  dEBRUYNE: documentation monero side is kindof done. i2p side is very much implementation specific.  I suppose we could write some guides for the most popular implementations?  e.g. i2p-zero aims to be zero conf, but i2pd or Kovri would be differnet.  I see, great  vtnerd___: Do you want to add anything?  could amend the current kovri guide for monero use from --exclusive-peer to the new proxy support  Now I have i2p-zero running and tested with the #5091, I plan to jump back over to helping knaccc on getting that polished.  I added support for socks proxy in the basic wallets  ^ excellent  Yes vtnerd___ I havent tested it yet but looks sweet.  So connections to `monerod` over Toi2p are possible within wallet cli and wallet rpc  Awesome  This also implies auth+encryption even if ssl is not in use (when using an onion or i2p address)  All right  moneromooo: are you here? If so, could you perhaps share what you've been working on?  I am.  I revived the SSL PR, more stuff on multi sender txes, an implementation of ArticMine's new block size algorithm.  I presume a multi sender tx works similar to multisig insofar as the senders have to exchange data before the transaction can be performed right?  Yes.  There are 2 SSL PRs. What's the diff?  Theoretically this would also allow the sender to provide an output right? Which would be kind of similar to Bitcoin's P2EP  The second one adds some things like selecting a cert by fingerprint.  Yes.  (for the first sentence)  All right, awesome  For anyone reading, this breaks the assumption of the inputs belonging to a single sender, which makes analysis more difficult  Nice side-effect.  Much work coming for the various wallets to support that  rbrunner: Anything you'd like to share in the meeting btw?  Yes, just a little info  I have started to seriously investigate what it would mean to integrate Monero into OpenBazaar  I have already talked with 2 of their devs, was very interesting  In maybe 2 or 3 weeks I intend to write a report  Too early to tell much more :)  Soon^tm I guess :)  Yep  Currently wrestling with Go debugging  whole new world  moneromooo: Has pony recently shared any insights regarding the upcoming 0.14 release btw?  No.  All right  I would love to see the tor & i2p PR's merged sooner rather than later so we can get more testing done.  ^ +1  Isn't that famous early code freeze already on the horizon?  fluffypony, luigi1111 ^  I suppose I could provide a little update regarding the GUI btw  As always, lots of bug fixes and improvements :-P  selsta has recently added a feature to support multi accounts  dsc_ has revamped the wizard and will now start working on implementing the different modes and a white theme  dsc_ is working fulltime on the GUI already?  yes  :)   dsc_ is bae  In light of the recent payment ID discussion, we've also, by default, disabled the option to add a payment ID unless the user explicitely activates the option on the settings page  rehrar ^  nice   I spoke about this yesterday at the coffee chat, this is not a good decision.  How does it handle integrated addresses? The same way?  rehrar ?   For the next many months, we are still stuck with PAyment IDs in the ecosystem. Making it harder for people to access them will make Monero suck so hard to use for the average person for many months.  i agree with rehrar   Remove the option of Payment IDs when we remove Payment IDs  rehrar: The new GUI release won't be live until probably mid march though  Which is a few weeks in advance of the scheduled protocol upgrade   Payment ID removal comes in October   right, but Payment IDs are not removed in March  Did we not have loose consensus on removing the old, unencrypted payment IDs in march?   they are removed in October  We had discussed a deprecation in March  and a ban in October   ok, then if we are going to do that, we have to commit to it and contact the exchanges like Binance that use them and get rid of them in the next few months  (of unencrypted)   Binance is huge, and if they still use them, then people will be very upset that they can't deposit or use Payment IDs easily   I'm just speaking from a UX perspective.  I thought it was unencrypted in April and possibly encrypted in October  Yes I do agree  Timeline and notes: https://github.com/monero-project/meta/issues/299  impossible to remove them for march, many exchanges still use them  We can defer it to the 0.15 release if needed  Well, that wasn't the impression for them log that I just read today  This was all discussed in the earlier meeting linked above   We have to force the ecosystem off of Payment IDs before we remove them from the UI, is all I'm saying  Remove != make difficult to use  ... or make them more difficult there, right?  ping sgp_   sarang, I understand, and I agreed with you during that meeting. But then I started thinking of it as a UX person, which I am.   And that huge massive problem leapt out at me  i think making them difficult to generate is a good idea but making them difficult to consume and use is a bad idea  well, maybe not a good idea, but a better idea   ^  If we defer the decision to depriciate long payment IDs to october, won't we have the same issue then?  The UI can gave an expandable payment ID field like MyMonero and we can still call it deprecated   It is foolhardy to remove an option that the ecosystem uses. So I suggest we keep the Payment ID in the UI until October when they are completely banned.   no dEBRYUNE, because they will be banned via consensus  sgp_ imo it may be a misdirection of dev resources to add that since things are proceeding in the short term rather than long term  but this is a relatively minor point  Nothing matters til exchanges change  All right   The issue is that consensus will still have them in April, and exchanges won't upgrade because they are still allowed. Thus they must still be in the UI.  endogenic these changes are already merged in the GUI to hide it like you do  ok   But when they are banned, exchanges are forced to upgrade or stop using Monero, so we can remove them safely because they won't be in use  rehrar: that's a strong assumption   sarang that they will upgrade?  yes   if they don't, then they can't use Monero  If exchanges require pid, users need a way to set a pid. Making it hard for the user in the interim is just going to be a nightmare.   we have decided to take our "stand" in October  A way that is not too hard, then  To be clear, we still intend to deprecate long encrypted payment IDs in April right? But no enforcement until October   the term "deprecated" doesn't mean much if it's still allowed, and used in popular places   yes, as far as I understand it   jtgrassie, exactly  True I suppose  dEBRUYNE: we need to be more specific when talking about deprecation   the person who suffers is the user  There are two proposals for GUI deprecation:  1. Hide it in the send screen with a simple option to expand (currently merged iirc)  2. Hide it completely in the send screen unless users enable the field in advanced settings (PR'd but not merged yet iirc)  What are the arguments for 2?   Both are poor options, but 1 is better than 2 by a long shot   Well the people who need to be made to "suffer" are the exchanges. And I don't see a way to make exchanges "suffer" other than by having their suffering customers complain to them constantly that they need to update.  ^  CLI has something similar where users need to set a manual payment ID transfer mode. Not sure if it's merged yet   the way to make the exchanges suffer is when we ban PIDs. They either upgrade or don't use Monero.  exact;y  Agree with rerahr here  have exchanges been provided with clear, practical, sufficient technical upgrade plans for supporting what they're doing with PIDs but with subaddrs?    Both are poor options, but 1 is better than 2 by a long shot <= I wouldn't call 1. a poor option. Have you actually checked how it looks?  Because it states "Payment ID" and a user has to click on the + to expand the field  endogenic: yes the email when out. Blog post coming soon, but contains the same info as the email  also the exhcnages' users are often using wallets that don't support subaddresses  ok great   as well, it should be noted that the timeline for exchanges to upgrade is September, not October when the fork is.  Which wallets are that?  Rehrar: I don't see option 1. causing any issues/confusion  i guess it doesnt matter too much if withdrawing as a personal user the main address should suffice   Because September is when the new versions will be coming out without PIDs in the UI  If there's opposition to 2, 1 is fine. We can still call it deprecated which is the optics we need anyway   exchange users are often just using other exchanges lol. No wallets involved.   dsc_ dEBRUYNE, ok, I trust you guys here then  rbrunner: i was thinking mymonero last i heard  Ok  pigeons: rbrunner yes receiving on subaddresses won't be supported yet  sending to them has been possible though  and yes as learnandlurkin says often they withdraw to other systems like exhcnages that also dont yet support subaddresses  I really can't come up with any good argument for 2. right now  endogenic: seems not much of an issue then. Exchanges will typically support withdrawals to both subaddresses and plain addresses (especially if we are going to force them to use subaddresses)  For deposits, MyMonero works properly if the user sends to a subaddress  Actually the second solution was already merged: https://github.com/monero-project/monero-gui/pull/1866  Maybe not enough eyes watching :)   The important thing is to have done something to justify having a big "DEPRECATED IN APRIL" stamp on PIDs to spook exchanges in the interim  This was for solution 1: https://github.com/monero-project/monero-gui/pull/1855   The Monero Community Workgroup will start making noise everywhere we can to exchanges, and everywhere else that will listen. Try to get on those garbage news sites also.   So everyone knows that deprecated in April, and banned in September  Hey, for solution 1, write "Payment ID (optional, deprecated)" or similar there  rbrunner: noted  rehrar: probably wait until the blog post, but it should only be a few days   Maybe a Reddit sticky post would be useful?   With the blog post   If people are over freaking out about the hashrate  or terabyte blockchain :)  sigh  Any questions for the MRL side?  Is someone checking ArticMine's block size changes for weird behaviour in some cases etc ?  How would such testing work? Private blockchain?  I'm waiting on cost information from ArticMine to complete the model  Or just simulations?  Also, smooth suggested a mean rather than median for the 100000 block op. It would indeed be much nicer if it doesn't make the change worse.  You mean computationally or what?  Nicer ? Yes.  no sorting needed for mean  I'll add a separate sim for that  Well, just nicer. Forger the much.  Forger the Much sounds like the formal name of a Lord of the Rings character  :)  To close the payment ID discussion, in essence, we agree that we shouldn't make it difficult for the user to add a payment ID right (until 0.15 is released)  ?  I don't. I did make it harder.  In the CLI, somewhat other story, I would say  than the GUI  People there are used to juggle with options and CL parameters  rehrar: I recommend opening another issue to reverse 1866 and we can gather feedback on it there  Sounds good, to me at least   Dudes, if I do a Jitsi stream right now to show the new FFS in action, would you guys be interested in watching it?  I'd watch it, if the meeting is formally done  sure  yeah, can I start one and record it?   I'll give it in like fifteen minutes   I'll let you all know, stand by  I have a question on tx_extra if no one else has anything to talk about  People have said you can put arbitrary data in there in whatever format you want as long as you're willing to pay for it. However, do you need to mine the transaction for it to be included? I didn't think nodes would block transactions with arbitrary tx_extra data  It'll be in nodes' txpool when you relay it. A wallet could see it before it's mined.  moneromooo: will it be mined though?  by others  Is it valid ?  assume it's otherwise valid  Does it have a high enough fee ?  assume it does yes  I ran into conflicting information here: https://monero.stackexchange.com/a/3627/42  Then it will probably be mined.  I once had the idea to put "my" MMS messages in there, looked at the code, and found no hard blocks for tx_extra data  That answer looks incorrect.  It is incorrect  If it will be mined, then that meets my assumption. There seems to be some misconception that people will not mine transactions with arbitrary tx_extra. I can add some comments there  And please don't spam it, and don't put fingerprintable stuff in it. It's meant to be here for *useful* stuff that's "uniform" enough.  It will be mined, whether a wallet *displays* the tx_extra is a different question.  I don't think any wallet currently displays that  it soes if its a pid  I think  Yeah, of course :)  Great, that answers my question 
submitted by dEBRUYNE_1 to Monero [link] [comments]

It's Time to Let Everyone in on Litecoin's Biggest Secret

Fellow Consumers,
It's possible that you might be getting a little upset at the current BTC fees. Please assist me in sending, or editing as you see fit, this drafted outline and email to whichever business you feel would benefit from using Litecoin instead. Or you can make a video, or tweet the link, or 100 other things. Just help in bringing attention to Litecoin in BTC's mempool time of need. It's time they learned Litecoin's biggest secret .... It’s THE BEST payment method out there. Also, please support businesses that currently accept Litecoin. I've put together a list below the draft.
........................................................................................................................................
BEGIN EMAIL DRAFT
To whom it may concern,
Has your company ever considered receiving the alternative payment currency Litecoin?
To begin, you may already be accepting bitcoin and Litecoin is very similar to bitcoin. If you're unfamiliar with bitcoin as a currency then Litecoin is a great place to start. They are even built from the same Core coding. A benefit to Litecoin is that it has a 2.5 minute block time instead of bitcoin's 10 minutes. This makes Litecoin's transaction speed four times faster and much less expensive than bitcoin. In layman's terms, this just means payment is confirmed faster and less expensively with Litecoin.
For reference - you can see the average fee of both bitcoin and Litecoin in US Dollars compared here: https://bitinfocharts.com/comparison/transactionfees-btc-ltc.html#1y
This chart shows the average fee for Litecoin is staying around 10 to 20 cents, and bitcoin bouncing between a low of $1.50 and $8.00 recently. This means you would pay less in fees to convert the same total value into fiat or USD in this case.
If you were to compare this to the average credit card transaction fees, of say 2.5%, any transaction over $5.00 would be more profitable through Litecoin.
Reference of fees found here: https://www.cardfellow.com/average-fees-for-credit-card-processing/#Typical
If you've heard of Litecoin, I'm sure you have heard the saying "Litecoin is the silver to bitcoin's gold." But really, Litecoin should really be considered Platinum instead of silver. Platinum is stronger, more durable, and much more ductile. Over 20% of all consumer goods either contain platinum or are produced using platinum. Platinum is truly an enduring metal just as Litecoin is truly an enduring cryptocurrency. It will be 6 years old this October, bitcoin is 8 years old.
A few facts that demonstrate Litecoin's strength, durability, and ductility are listed below:
  1. Litecoin has a large economy and your current bitcoin technology should work on Litecoin with very little changes. If you don't use bitcoin, it is still easy to implement.
  2. Litecoin has the best combination of economic size and technical similarity to bitcoin than any other cryptocurrencies.
  3. Litecoin is capable of eight times as many transactions as bitcoin in a ten minute period.
  4. Litecoin has much faster confirmation times with blocks that are not full.
  5. Litecoin has proven its longevity compared to many other cryptocurrencies that have come and gone.
  6. Also, if changes ever need to be made to Litecoin, it doesn't take years to implement them. Litecoin implemented Segregated Witness before bitcoin, and will most likely run on the lightning network before bitcoin as well. If you don't deal with bitcoin, this all just means Litecoin is a front runner in implementing new technology and features.
  7. Litecoin is a limited supply coin, launched fairly, with no coins premined (no developer is hiding a majority somewhere), nor has it ever hard forked for any special interest groups. It is decentralized and no one person or group controls what happens to it and no one person or group can manipulate the market.
  8. Whole Litecoins are much more affordable than whole bitcoins. This helps eliminate some psychological barriers to entering the market.
In conclusion:
If your company was to accept Litecoin, I would be happy to start conducting my business with you.
If your company accepts bitcoin payments but not Litecoin, I hope I have helped shed some light on the benefits Litecoin could bring to your business.
If your business does not accept bitcoin payments, I hope I have introduced you to an alternative payment option that a large number of people transact with everyday who would love to add you to their list of merchants accepting Litecoin. It really is the currency of the future.
If you have any questions about Litecoin or need help in possibly implementing Litecoin into your business, please let us know. There are many of us here excited to help you transition into accepting Litecoin or to help you further and answer any questions you may have.
We can be found here:
[email protected]
[email protected]
https://www.reddit.com/Litecoin
https://twitter.com/LitecoinCA
http://litecoinalliance.org/
https://twitter.com/ltcfoundation
https://twitter.com/litecoinsupport
A few options of the easiest ways to implement Litecoin payments currently are:
  1. https://shapeshift.io - currently used by Overstock.com - "The Safest, Fastest Asset Exchange on Earth"
  2. https://coinpayments.net/ - Payment gateway for LTC & BTC
  3. https://alfacoins.com/ - an international LTC & BTC payment processor
  4. https://www.asmoney.com/ - an electronic payment system for LTC & BTC
  5. https://www.gocoin.com/ - Enabling merchants to accept BTC & LTC payments
  6. http://cointopay.com/ - Provides merchant services in LTC, BTC, & many others
  7. https://www.cryptowoo.com/ - a decentralized payment plugin to accept LTC, DOGE, & BTC
  8. https://gourl.io/ - an open source crypto-currency payment gateway
  9. https://litepaid.com/ - accept LTC, BTC, & over 25 others fast & easy
END EMAIL DRAFT ........................................................................................................................................
This below is for LTC spending reference. No need to include it in any email. Dots were added in for any mobile users who can't see the formatted lines.
Places to spend Litecoin:
Please feel free to mention any links/sites/businesses you know of - It took me a bit to compile this list or PM me and I will add your business link to whichever category you prefer. Also, please verify with the consumer they still accept Litecoin or are still an active domain before purchasing.
A Bit of Everything:
https://overstock.com - Furniture, Decor, Cars, Pet Adoptions, Jewelry, Clothing
http://bitroadmarket.com/en/ - Electronics , Home and Kitchen
http://shop.btcs.com/ - Jewelry, Coins, Shirts, Collectors Items
https://bitcoingalaxy.us/shop/ - Jewelry, Coins, Shirts, Collectors Items
https://www.all-mints.com/- Gift Cards, PCs, Clothing, Food, Tools, Perfume, Electronics, Bags, Shoes, Gifts, Pet Products
Art & Collectibles:
https://bitographs.com/ - Crypto Posters
https://dogmaportraits.uservoice.com/ - Prints of your uploaded pet photos
http://cryptoart.com/ - Crypto themed art
http://bitcoinsportscards.com/ - Sports Cards
http://aircraft-photos.com/ - Aircraft photos
http://www.juanmiguelsalas.com/blog/ - Art - Blogger
http://www.benzandbeamer.com/ - Luxury Cars
Clothing/Jewelry:
https://Digswag.com - Clothing, Unique Items, Pets, Home and Office
https://Coinpupil.com - Crypto themed clothing
https://allthingsluxury.biz/ - Fine Jewelry
http://www.afkapparel.co.uk/ - Geek/Gamer clothing
http://www.sakamaonline.com/ - Leather and Rugs
https://www.siamsecrets-auz.com/ - Siam clothing
https://cryptocurrencygear.com/ - Crypto gear
https://www.topshelftoker.com/ - Shirt and Hat
https://allthingsdecentral.com/ - Card games, Hardware wallets, clothing, Beginners Box
http://shiresoaps.com/ - Soap
https://5mr.com/ - Baby Wearing
https://www.cryptojeweler.com/ - Jewelry
https://www.cheveux-naturels.com/ - Hair Extensions
https://www.etsy.com/shop/JestersLeather - Leather
http://www.cryptoverge.com/ - Crypto clothing
http://moniebug.com/ - Chlidren's Clothing (Launch Party Sept 30th - Coming Soon)
https://chicagogemshop.com/ - Precious Gems and Crystals
https://litecoinmerch.com/ - Litecoin Merchandise - Donates 25% Back to LTC Foundation!
https://twitter.com/LitecoinMerch
Domains/Hosting/and Other Digital Services:
https://nameselling.com - Domain names
http://www.lovinghosting.com/ - Linux Web Hosting
http://www.lovingdomains.com/ - Domain names
https://www.vps-city.com/ - Virtual Private Servers
https://flokinet.is/en/ - Anonymous Servers
https://coinshost.com/en/ - Web Hosting and DDos Protection
http://www.qhoster.com/ - Hosting, VPS, Servers, Domains
https://briehost.com/ - Hosting, VPS, Servers, Domains
https://www.hostmycode.in/ - Hosting, VPS, Servers, Domains, Wordpress, SSD Reseller
https://www.cinfu.com/ - Shared Hosting, VPS, Dedicated Servers, Domains, SSL Digital Certificates
http://ellenet.com.au/ - Web Hosting, Web Design, Server Maintenance, Web Development
https://247zilla.com/ - Cloud Hosting
https://hosthavoc.com - Game/Minecraft/Voice Servers and Web Hosting
https://www.simrai.com/ - Game/Minecraft/Voice Servers and Web Hosting, Package Deals
https://143vpn.com/ - VPN, DDoS protection
https://torguard.net/ - VPN, Anonymous Email, Anonymous Proxy
https://www.trilightzone.org/ - VPN Services
http://gameservers.today/ - Game and Voice Servers
https://xwebhosting.org/ - Dedicated and Cloud Servers, Web Hosting, Datacenters
http://www.onenetwork.net/ - Servers and VPS
http://instantcpanelhosting.com/ $0.5 Hosting, $4 VPS, Domains, Dedicated Servers, SSL
https://koddos.net/ - DDoS protection, Off shore hosting
http://www.coinrdp.com/
https://axelwebhosting.com - Web Hosting
18+:
http://www.vieci.com/# - Assorted Adult Products
Food and Drinks:
https://tealet.com/litecoin - Assorted Teas, Loose Leaf
https://www.drinkcham.com/ - Award Winning Cold Brew Tea
https://www.cryptomercado.com/ - Coffee, Jerky, Nuts, Snacks
https://crypto-coffee.com/ - Coffee
http://drapis.com/ - Raw Honey
Furniture:
https://distinguishedimports.com/shop/ - Hand Blown Glass, Decor, Vintage Furniture
Game Keys:
https://key4co.in/ - Game Keys
https://www.cjs-cdkeys.com/ - Game Keys and Physical Discs
https://gamerzheat.com/ - Game Keys and Software
Gift cards:
https://www.gyft.com
https://www.cryptodechange.com/
https://www.egifter.com/litecoin/
https://bitcoingiftcards.com.au/
https://www.cryfter.com/
https://giftoff.com/
Gold and Silver:
https://www.coaex.com/ - Gold and Silver Bars
http://www.bitgild.com/ - Gold, Silver, Platinum, Palladium, Accessories
http://www.bitcoinmetals.us/ - Copper, Gold, and Silver Bullions
Law firms:
https://sohovichlaw.com/ - DUI Defense
Miscellaneous:
http://coinmap.org - Map of Local Businesses
https://www.unlockbase.com/ - Unlock iPhone
https://www.custommuzzlebrakes.com/ - Custom Gun/Rifle Parts
http://www.getballistic.com/ - Body boards
http://www.3dp4btc.com/ - 3D Printing
Music:
http://www.shanthagopian.com/
http://www.progmegastore.com/store/ - Memorabilia, Vinyl, and Collectors Items, CDs and DVDs
http://cryptopay.trebaltek.ca/wp/
Other Electronics:
http://www.thermostatenshop.nl/ - Thermostats
http://www.heat4feet.net/nl/ - Floor Heating maps, rugs, thermostats
http://www.opritverwarmingen.eu/ - Heating cables, thermostats, and control systems
https://www.vorstvrij.net/nl/ - Heating cables and thermostats
http://www.keraheat.com/ - Assorted heating products
Pet Supplies:
http://cryptopet.com/ (Out of date site)
Physical Coins:
http://www.lealana.com/ (also sold on bitcointalk.org forum)
Travel:
https://www.cheapair.com - Plane tickets
https://btctrip.com/ - Festivals, Burning Man, Museums, Trips
http://finnatravel.com/ - Travel Agency
https://www.mercadoviagens.com/ - Brazil Travel Agency
http://3s.ee/booking/# - Estonia Hotel
https://www.surfranchnicaragua.com/bitcoins - All Inclusive Nicaragua Resort
Vape Nation:
https://arkansaseliquid.com/ - Vape Shop
https://www.vaposhop.com/ - Vape Shop
https://azarius.net/ - Assorted 'exhalant' supplies
http://btcheadshop.com/- Assorted 'exhalant' supplies
https://www.fogonthetyne.eu/- Vape Shop
https://www.ecigsplus.com/- Vape Shop
https://vapourdepot.com/- Vape Shop
http://www.tobaccoseed.company/ - 'Grow your own' Tobacco Seeds
https://kingpenvapes.com/- Vape Shop
http://www.digitalcloudvapor.com/- Vape Shop
Current Litecoin Developments - For Reference
Litecoin Roadmap - https://litecoincore.org/
Lightning Network
LN - vid by LTC Foundation's Franklyn
ln.network
RSK - Rootstock Sidechains
RSK - vid by LTC Foundation's Franklyn
rsk.co
MAST - Smart Contracts
Inside MAST: The Little-Known Plan to Advance Bitcoin Smart Contracts
Multisig Wallets
Multisig - vid by LTC Foundation's Franklyn
If you find any errors, mistakes, have suggestions of websites, comments on the wording, or what have you, just let me know in the comments or through PM. Also, as a disclaimer: I can not confirm every website above is still active or still accepts LTC, some accept but you have to email them first. I also left all the gambling websites out because those are hard to verify their trustworthiness.
Also, feel free to cross post this anywhere you want on the internet. You can edit and create whatever medium, youtube, twitter, reddit, voat, 4chan, bloomberg post you want. Feel absolutely free to get all that sweet sweet karma for yourself.
EDIT: I'll no longer keep this list up. I'll keep updating https://redd.it/6w0khi over in litecoinmarkets so you can always link to that.
submitted by 1JoeLite1 to litecoin [link] [comments]

batching in Bitcoin

On May 6th, 2017, Bitcoin hit an all-time high in transactions processed on the network in a single day: it moved 375,000 transactions which accounted for a nominal output of about $2.5b. Average fees on the Bitcoin network had climbed over a dollar for the first time a couple days prior. And they kept climbing: by early June average fees hit an eye-watering $5.66. This was quite unprecedented. In the three-year period from Jan. 1 2014 to Jan. 1 2017, per-transaction fees had never exceeded 31 cents on a weekly average. And the hits kept coming. Before 2017 was over, average fees would top out at $48 on a weekly basis. When the crypto-recession set in, transaction count collapsed and fees crept back below $1.
During the most feverish days of the Bitcoin run-up, when normal users found themselves with balances that would cost more to send than they were worth, cries for batching — the aggregation of many outputs into a single transaction — grew louder than ever. David Harding had written a blog post on the cost-savings of batching at the end of August and it was reposted to the Bitcoin subreddit on a daily basis.
The idea was simple: for entities sending many transactions at once, clustering outputs into a single transaction was more space- (and cost-) efficient, because each transaction has a fixed data overhead. David found that if you combined 10 payments into one transaction, rather than sending them individually, you could save 75% of the block space. Essentially, batching is one way to pack as many transactions as possible into the finite block space available on Bitcoin.
When fees started climbing in mid-2017, users began to scrutinize the behavior of heavy users of the Bitcoin blockchain, to determine whether they were using block space efficiently. By and large, they were not — and an informal lobbying campaign began, in which these major users — principally exchanges — were asked to start batching transactions and be good stewards of the scarce block space at their disposal. Some exchanges had been batching for years, others relented and implemented it. The question faded from view after Bitcoin’s price collapsed in Q1 2018 from roughly $19,000 to $6000, and transaction load — and hence average fee — dropped off.
But we remained curious. A common refrain, during the collapse in on-chain usage, was that transaction count was an obfuscated method of apprehending actual usage. The idea was that transactions could encode an arbitrarily large (within reason) number of payments, and so if batching had become more and more prevalent, those payments were still occurring, just under a regime of fewer transactions.

“hmmm”
Some sites popped up to report outputs and payments per day rather than transactions, seemingly bristling at the coverage of declining transaction count. However, no one conducted an analysis of the changing relationship between transaction count and outputs or payments. We took it upon ourselves to find out.
Table Of Contents:
Introduction to batching
A timeline
Analysis
Conclusion
Bonus content: UTXO consolidation
  1. Introduction to batching
Bitcoin uses a UTXO model, which stands for Unspent Transaction Output. In comparison, Ripple and Ethereum use an account/balance model. In bitcoin, a user has no balances, only UTXOs that they control. If they want to transfer money to someone else, their wallet selects one or more UTXOs as inputs that in sum need to add up to the amount they want to transfer. The desired amount then goes to the recipient, which is called the output, and the difference goes back to the sender, which is called change output. Each output can carry a virtually unlimited amount of value in the form of satoshis. A satoshi is a unit representing a one-hundred-millionth of a Bitcoin. This is very similar to a physical wallet full of different denominations of bills. If you’re buying a snack for $2.50 and only have a $5, you don’t hand the cashier half of your 5 dollar bill — you give him the 5 and receive some change instead.
Unknown to some, there is no hardcoded limit to the number of transactions that can fit in a block. Instead, each transaction has a certain size in megabytes and constitutes an economic incentive for miners to include it in their block. Because miners have limited space of 2 MB to sell to transactors, larger transactions (in size, not bitcoin!) will need to pay higher fees to be included. Additionally, each transaction can have a virtually unlimited number of inputs or outputs — the record stands at transactions with 20,000 inputs and 13,107 outputs.
So each transaction has at least one input and at one output, but often more, as well as some additional boilerplate stuff. Most of that space is taken up by the input (often 60% or more, because of the signature that proves they really belong to the sender), while the output(s) account for 15–30%. In order to keep transactions as small as possible and save fees, Bitcoin users have two major choices:
Use as few inputs as possible. In order to minimize inputs, you can periodically send your smaller UTXOs to yourself in times when fees are very low, getting one large UTXO back. That is called UTXO consolidation or consolidating your inputs.
Users who frequently make transfers (especially within the same block) can include an almost unlimited amount of outputs (to different people!) in the same transaction. That is called transaction batching. A typical single output transaction takes up 230 bytes, while a two output transaction only takes up 260 bytes, instead of 460 if you were to send them individually.
This is something that many casual commentators overlook when comparing Bitcoin with other payment systems — a Bitcoin transaction can aggregate thousands of individual economic transfers! It’s important to recognize this, as it is the source of a great deal of misunderstanding and mistaken analysis.
We’ve never encountered a common definition of a batched transaction — so for the purposes of this study we define it in the loosest possible sense: a transaction with three or more outputs. Commonly, batching is understood as an activity undertaken primarily by mining pools or exchanges who can trade off immediacy for efficiency. It is rare that a normal bitcoin user would have cause to batch, and indeed most wallets make it difficult to impossible to construct batched transactions. For everyday purposes, normal bitcoiners will likely not go to the additional effort of batching transactions.
We set the threshold at three for simplicity’s sake — a normal unbatched transaction will have one transactional output and one change output — but the typical major batched transaction from an exchange will have dozens if not hundreds of outputs. For this reason we are careful to provide data on various different batch sizes, so we could determine the prevalence of three-output transactions and colossal, 100-output ones.
We find it helpful to think of a Bitcoin transaction as a mail truck full of boxes. Each truck (transaction) contains boxes (outputs), each of contains some number of letters (satoshis). So when you’re looking at transaction count as a measure of the performance and economic throughput of the Bitcoin network, it’s a bit like counting mail trucks to discern how many letters are being sent on a given day, even though the number of letters can vary wildly. The truck analogy also makes it clear why many see Bitcoin as a settlement layer in the future — just as mail trucks aren’t dispatched until they’re full, some envision that the same will ultimately be the case for Bitcoin.

Batching
  1. A timeline
So what actually happened in the last six months? Let’s look at some data. Daily transactions on the Bitcoin network rose steadily until about May 2017, when average fees hit about $4. This precipitated the first collapse in usage. Then began a series of feedback loops over the next six months in which transaction load grew, fees grew to match, and transactions dropped off. This cycle repeated itself five times over the latter half of 2017.

more like this on coinmetrics.io
The solid red line in the above chart is fees in BTC terms (not USD) and the shaded red area is daily transaction count. You can see the cycle of transaction load precipitating higher fees which in turn cause a reduction in usage. It repeats itself five or six times before the detente in spring 2018. The most notable period was the December-January fee crisis, but fees were actually fairly typical in BTC terms — the rising BTC price in USD however meant that USD fees hit extreme figures.
In mid-November when fees hit double digits in USD terms, users began a concerted campaign to convince exchanges to be better stewards of block space. Both Segwit and batching were held up as meaningful approaches to maximize the compression of Bitcoin transactions into the finite block space available. Data on when exchanges began batching is sparse, but we collected information where it was available into a chart summarizing when exchanges began batching.

Batching adoption at selected exchanges
We’re ignoring Segwit adoption by exchanges in this analysis; as far as batching is concerned, the campaign to get exchanges to batch appears to have persuaded Bitfinex, Binance, and Shapeshift to batch. Coinbase/GDAX have stated their intention to begin batching, although they haven’t managed to integrate it yet. As far as we can tell, Gemini hasn’t mentioned batching, although we have some mixed evidence that they may have begun recently. If you know about the status of batching on Gemini or other major exchanges please get in touch.
So some exchanges have been batching all along, and some have never bothered at all. Did the subset of exchanges who flipped the switch materially affect the prevalence of batched transactions? Let’s find out.
  1. Analysis
3.1 How common is batching?
We measured the prevalence of batching in three different ways, by transaction count, by output value and by output count.

The tl;dr.
Batching accounts for roughly 12% of all transactions, 40% of all outputs, and 30–60% of all raw BTC output value. Not bad.
3.2 Have batched transactions become more common over time?
From the chart in 3.1, we can already see a small, but steady uptrend in all three metrics, but we want to dig a little deeper. So we first looked at the relationship of payments (all outputs that actually pay someone, so total outputs minus change outputs) and transactions.

More at transactionfee.info/charts
The first thing that becomes obvious is that the popular narrative — that the drop in transactions was caused by an increase in batching — is not the case; payments dropped by roughly the same proportion as well.
Dividing payment count by transaction count gives us some insight into the relationship between the two.

In our analysis we want to zoom into the time frame between November 2017 and today, and we can see that payments per transactions have actually been rallying, from 1.5 payments per transaction in early 2017 to almost two today.
3.3 What are popular batch sizes?
In this next part, we will look at batch sizes to see which are most popular. To determine which transactions were batched, we downloaded a dataset of all transactions on the Bitcoin network between November 2017 and May 2018from Blockchair.
We picked that period because the fee crisis really got started in mid-November, and with it, the demands for exchanges to batch. So we wanted to capture the effect of exchanges starting to batch. Naturally a bigger sample would have been more instructive, but we were constrained in our resources, so we began with the six month sample.
We grouped transactions into “batched” and “unbatched” groups with batched transactions being those with three or more outputs.

We then divided batched transactions into roughly equal groups on the basis of how much total output in BTC they had accounted for in the six-month period. We didn’t select the batch sizes manually — we picked batch sizes that would split the sample into equal parts on the basis of transaction value. Here’s what we ended up with:

All of the batch buckets have just about the same fraction of total BTC output over the period, but they account for radically different transaction and output counts over the period. Notice that there were only 183,108 “extra large” batches (with 41 or more outputs) in the six-month period, but between them there were 23m outputs and 30m BTC worth of value transmitted.
Note that output value in this context refers to the raw or unadjusted figure — it would have been prohibitively difficult for us to adjust output for change or mixers, so we’re using the “naive” estimate.
Let’s look at how many transactions various batch sizes accounted for in the sample period:


Batched transactions steadily increased relative to unbatched ones, although the biggest fraction is the small batch with between 3 and 5 outputs. The story for output counts is a bit more illuminating. Even though batched transactions are a relatively small fraction of overall transaction count, they contain a meaningful number of overall outputs. Let’s see how it breaks down:


Lastly, let’s look at output value. Here we see that batched transactions represent a significant fraction of value transmitted on Bitcoin.


As we can see, even though batched transactions make up an average of only 12% of all transactions, they move between 30%-60% of all Bitcoins, at peak times even 70%. We think this is quite remarkable. Keep in mind, however that the ‘total output’ figure has not been altered to account for change outputs, mixers, or self-churn; that is, it is the raw and unadjusted figure. The total output value is therefore not an ideal approximation of economic volume on the Bitcoin network.
3.4 Has transaction count become an unreliable measure of Bitcoin’s usage because of batching?
Yes. We strongly encourage any analysts, investors, journalists, and developers to look past mere transaction count from now on. The default measure of Bitcoin’s performance should be “payments per day” rather than transaction count. This also makes Bitcoin more comparable with other UTXO chains. They generally have significantly variable payments-per-transaction ratios, so just using payments standardizes that. (Stay tuned: Coinmetrics will be rolling out tools to facilitate this very soon.)
More generally, we think that the economic value transmitted on the network is its most fundamental characteristic. Both the naive and the adjusted figures deserve to be considered. Adjusting raw output value is still more art than science, and best practices are still being developed. Again, Coinmetrics is actively developing open-source tools to make these adjustments available.
  1. Conclusion
We started by revisiting the past year in Bitcoin and showed that while the mempool was congested, the community started looking for ways to use the blockspace more efficiently. Attention quickly fell on batching, the practice of combining multiple outputs into a single transaction, for heavy users. We showed how batching works on a technical level and when different exchanges started implementing the technique.
Today, around 12% of all transactions on the Bitcoin network are batched, and these account for about 40% of all outputs and between 30–60% of all transactional value. The fact such that a small set of transactions carries so much economic weight makes us hopeful that Bitcoin still has a lot of room to scale on the base layer, especially if usage trends continue.
Lastly, it’s worth noting that the increase in batching on the Bitcoin network may not be entirely due to deliberate action by exchanges, but rather a function of its recessionary behavior in the last few months. Since batching is generally done by large industrial players like exchanges, mixers, payment processors, and mining pools, and unbatched transactions are generally made by normal individuals, the batched/unbatched ratio is also a strong proxy for how much average users are using Bitcoin. Since the collapse in price, it is quite possible that individual usage of Bitcoin decreased while “industrial” usage remained strong. This is speculation, but one explanation for what happened.
Alternatively, the industrial players appear to be taking their role as stewards of the scarce block space more seriously. This is a significant boon to the network, and a nontrivial development in its history. If a culture of parsimony can be encouraged, Bitcoin will be able to compress more data into its block space and everyday users will continue to be able to run nodes for the foreseeable future. We view this as a very positive development. Members of the Bitcoin community that lobbied exchanges to add support for Segwit and batching should be proud of themselves.
  1. Bonus content: UTXO consolidation
Remember that we said that a second way to systematically save transaction fees in the Bitcoin network was to consolidate your UTXOs when fees were low? Looking at the relationship between input count and output count allows us to spot such consolidation phases quite well.

Typically, inputs and outputs move together. When the network is stressed, they decouple. If you look at the above chart carefully, you’ll notice that when transactions are elevated (and block space is at a premium), outputs outpace inputs — look at the gaps in May and December 2017. However, prolonged activity always results in fragmented UTXO sets and wallets full of dust, which need to be consolidated. For this, users often wait until pressure on the network has decreased and fees are lower. Thus, after transactions decrease, inputs become more common than outputs. You can see this clearly in February/March 2017.

Here we’ve taken the ratio of inputs to outputs (which have been smoothed on a trailing 7 day basis). When the ratio is higher, there are more inputs than outputs on that day, and vice versa. You can clearly see the spam attack in summer 2015 in which thousands (possibly millions) of outputs were created and then consolidated. Once the ratio spikes upwards, that’s consolidation. The spike in February 2018 after the six weeks of high fees in December 2017 was the most pronounced sigh of relief in Bitcoin’s history; the largest ever departure from the in/out ratio norm. There were a huge number of UTXOs to be consolidated.
It’s also interesting to note where inputs and outputs cluster. Here we have histograms of transactions with large numbers of inputs or outputs. Unsurprisingly, round numbers are common which shows that exchanges don’t publish a transaction every, say, two minutes, but instead wait for 100 or 200 outputs to queue up and then publish their transaction. Curiously, 200-input transactions were more popular than 100-input transactions in the period.


We ran into more curiosities when researching this piece, but we’ll leave those for another time.
Future work on batching might focus on:
Determining batched transactions as a portion of (adjusted) economic rather than raw volume
Looking at the behavior of specific exchanges with regards to batching
Investigating how much space and fees could be saved if major exchanges were batching transactions
Lastly, we encourage everyone to run their transactions through the service at transactionfee.info to assess the efficiency of their transactions and determine whether exchanges are being good stewards of the block space.
Update 31.05.2018
Antoine Le Calvez has created a series of live-updated charts to track batching and batch sizes, which you can find here.
We’d like to thank 0xB10C for their generous assistance with datasets and advice, the people at Blockchair for providing the core datasets, and David A. Harding for writing the initial piece and answering our questions.
submitted by miguelfranco1412 to 800cc [link] [comments]

SegWit would make it HARDER FOR YOU TO PROVE YOU OWN YOUR BITCOINS. SegWit deletes the "chain of (cryptographic) signatures" - like MERS (Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems) deleted the "chain of (legal) title" for Mortgage-Backed Securities (MBS) in the foreclosure fraud / robo-signing fiasco

Summary (TL;DR)

Many people who study the financial crisis which started in 2008 know about "MERS", or "Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems" - a company / database containing over 62 million mortgages.
(The word "mortgages" may be unfamiliar to some non-English speakers - since it is not a cognate with most other languages. In French, they say "hypothèques", or "hipotecas" in Spanish, "Hypotheken" in German, etc).
The goal of MERS was to "optimize" the process of transferring "title" (legal ownership) of real-estate mortgages, from one owner to another.
But instead, in the 2010 "foreclosure crisis", MERS caused tens of billions of dollars in losses and damages - due to the "ususual" way it handled the crucial "ownership data" for real-estate mortgages - the data at the very heart of the database.
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=%22foreclosure+fraud%22+%22robo+signing%22+MERS&t=h_&ia=web
How did MERS handle this crucial "ownership data" for real-estate mortgages?
The "brilliant" idea behind MERS to "optimize" the process of conveying (transferring) mortgages was to separate - and eventually delete - all the data proving who transferred what to whom!
Hmm... that sounds vaguely familiar. What does that remind me of?
SegWit separating and then deleting the "chain of (cryptographic) signatures" for bitcoins sounds a lot like MERS separating and then deleting the "chain of (legal) title" for mortgages.
So, SegWit and MERS have a lot in common:
Of course, the "experts" (on Wall Street, and at AXA-owned Blockstream) present MERS and SegWit as "innovations" - as a way to "optimize" and "streamline" vast chains of transactions reflecting ownership and transfer of valuable items (ie, real-estate mortgages, and bitcoins).
But, unfortunately, the "brilliant bat-shit insane approach" devised by the "geniuses" behind MERS and SegWit to do this is to simply delete the data which proved ownership and transfer of these items - information which is essential for legal purposes (in the case of mortgages), or security purposes (in the case of bitcoins).
So, the most pernicious aspect of SegWit may be that it encourages deleting all of Bitcoin's cryptographic security data - destroying the "chain of signatures" which (according to the white paper) are what define what a "bitcoin" actually is.
Wow, deleting signatures with SegWit sounds bad. Can I avoid SegWit?
Yes you can.
To guarantee the long-term cryptographic, legal and financial security of your bitcoins:

Details

MERS = "The dog ate your mortgage's chain of title".
SegWit = "The dog ate your bitcoin's chain of signatures."
Wall Street-backed MERS = AXA-backed SegWit
It is probably no coincidence that:
How is AXA related to Blockstream?
Insurance multinational AXA, while not a household name, is actually the second-most-connected "fiat finance" firm in the world.
AXA's former CEO Pierre Castries was head of the secretive Bilderberg Group of the world's ultra-rich. (Recently, he moved on to HSBC.)
Due to AXA's massive exposure to derivatives (bigger than any other insurance company), it is reasonable to assume that AXA would be destroyed if Bitcoin reaches trillions of dollars in market cap as a major "counterparty-free" asset class - which would actually be quite easy using simple & safe on-chain scaling - ie, just using bigger blocks, and no SegWit.
So, the above facts provide one plausible explanation of why AXA-owned Blockstream seems to be quietly trying to undermine Bitcoin...
Do any Core / Blockstream devs and supporters know about MERS - and recognize its dangerous parallels with SegWit?
It would be interesting to hear from some of the "prominent" Core / Blockstream devs and supporters listed below to find out if they are aware of the dangerous similarities between SegWit and MERS:
Finally, it could also be interesting to hear from:
Core / Blockstream devs might not know about MERS - but AXA definitely does
While it is likely that most or all Core / Blockstream devs do not know about the MERS fiasco...
...it is 100% certain that people at AXA (the main owners of Blockstream) do know about MERS.
This is because the global financial crisis which started in 2008 was caused by:
The major financial media and blogs (Naked Capitalism, Zero Hedge, Credit Slips, Washington's Blog, etc.) covered MERS extensively:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Anakedcapitalism.com+mers&t=h_&ia=web
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Azerohedge.com+mers&t=h_&ia=web
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Acreditslips.org+mers&t=h_&ia=web
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Awashingtonsblog.com+mers&t=h_&ia=web
So people at all the major "fiat finance firms" such as AXA would of course be aware of CDOs, MBSs and MERS - since these have been "hot topics" in their industry since the start of the global financial crisis in 2008.
Eerie parallels between MERS and SegWit
Read the analysis below of MERS by legal scholar Christopher Peterson - and see if you notice the eerie parallels with SegWit (with added emphasis in bold, and commentary in square brackets):
http://scholarship.law.wm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3399&context=wmlr
Loans originated with MERS as the original mortgagee purport to separate the borrower’s promissory note, which is made payable to the originating lender, from the borrower’s conveyance of a mortgage, which purportedly is granted to MERS. If this separation is legally incorrect - as every state supreme court looking at the issue has agreed - then the security agreements do not name an actual mortgagee or beneficiary.
The mortgage industry, however, has premised its proxy recording strategy on this separation, despite the U.S. Supreme Court’s holding that “the note and mortgage are inseparable.” [Compare with the language from Satoshi's whitepaper: "We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures."]
If today’s courts take the Carpenter decision at its word, then what do we make of a document purporting to create a mortgage entirely independent of an obligation to pay? If the Supreme Court is right that a “mortgage can have no separate existence” from a promissory note, then a security agreement that purports to grant a mortgage independent of the promissory note attempts to convey something that cannot exist.
[...]
Many courts have held that a document attempting to convey an interest in realty fails to convey that interest if the document does not name an eligible grantee. Courts around the country have long held that “there must be, in every grant, a grantor, a grantee and a thing granted, and a deed wanting in either essential is absolutely void.”
The parallels between MERS and SegWit are obvious and inescapable.
Note that I am not arguing here that SegWit could be vulnerable to attacks from a strictly legal perspective. (Although that may be possible to.)
I am simply arguing that SegWit, because it encourages deleting the (cryptographic) signature data which defines "bitcoins", could eventually be vulnerable to attacks from a cryptographic perspective.
But I heard that SegWit is safe and tested!
Yeah, we've heard a lot of lies from Blockstream, for years - and meanwhile, they've only succeeded in destroying Bitcoin's market cap, due to unnecessarily high fees and unnecessarily slow transactions.
Now, in response to those legal-based criticisms of SegWit in the article from nChain, several so-called "Bitcoin legal experts" have tried to rebut that those arguments from nChain were somehow "flawed".
But if you read the rebuttals of these "Bitcoin legal experts", they sound a lot like the clueless "experts" who were cheerleading MERS for its "efficiency" - and who ended up costing tens billions of dollars in losses when the "chain of title" for mortgages held in the MERS database became "clouded" after all the crucial "ownership data" got deleted in the name of "efficiency" and "optimization".
In their attempt to rebut the article by nChain, these so-called "Bitcoin legal experts" use soothing language like "optimization" and "pragmatic" to try to lull you into believing that deleting the "chain of (cryptographic) signatures" for your bitcoins will be just as safe as deleting the "chain of (legal) notes" for mortgages:
http://www.coindesk.com/bitcoin-legal-experts-nchain-segwit-criticisms-flawed/
The (unsigned!) article on CoinDesk attempting to rebut Nguyen's article on nChain starts by stating:
Nguyen's criticisms fly in the face of what has emerged as broad support for the network optimization, which has been largely embraced by the network's developers, miners and startups as a pragmatic step forward.
Then it goes on to quote "Bitcoin legal experts" who claim that using SegWit to delete Bitcoin's cryptographic signatures will be just fine:
Marco Santori, a fintech lawyer who leads the blockchain tech team at Cooley LLP, for example, took issue with what he argued was the confused framing of the allegation.
Santori told CoinDesk:
"It took the concept of what is a legal contract, and took the position that if you have a blockchain signature it has something to do with a legal contract."
And:
Stephen Palley, counsel at Washington, DC, law firm Anderson Kill, remarked similarly that the argument perhaps put too much weight on the idea that the "signatures" involved in executing transactions on the bitcoin blockchain were or should be equivalent to signatures used in digital documents.
"It elides the distinction between signature and witness data and a digital signature, and they're two different things," Palley said.
And:
"There are other ways to cryptographically prove a transaction is correctly signed other than having a full node," said BitGo engineer Jameson Lopp. "The assumption that if a transaction is in the blockchain, it's probably valid, is a fairly good guarantee."
Legal experts asserted that, because of this design, it's possible to prove that the transaction occurred between parties, even if those involved did not store signatures.
For this reason, Coin Center director Jerry Brito argued that nChain is overstating the issues that would arise from the absence of this data.
"If you have one-time proof that you have the bitcoin, if you don't have it and I have it, logically it was signed over to me. As long as somebody in the world keeps the signature data and it's accessible, it's fine," he said.
There are several things you can notice here:
  • These so-called "Bitcoin legal experts" are downplaying the importance of signatures in Bitcoin - just like the "experts" behind MERS downplayed the importance of "notes" for mortgages.
  • Satoshi said that a bitcoin is a "chain of digital signatures" - but these "Bitcoin legal experts" are now blithely asserting that we can simply throw the "chain of digital signatures" in the trash - and we can be "fairly" certain that everything will "probably" be ok.
  • The "MERS = SegWit" argument which I'm making is not based on interpreting Bitcoin signatures in any legal sense (although some arguments could be made along those lines).
  • Instead, I'm just arguing that any "ownership database" which deletes its "ownership data" (whether it's MERS or SegWit) is doomed to end in disaster - whether that segregated-and-eventually-deleted "ownership data" is based on law (with MERS), or cryptography (with SegWit).
Who's right - Satoshi or the new "Bitcoin experts"?
You can make up your own mind.
Personally, I will never send / receive / store large sums of money using any "SegWit" bitcoin addresses.
This, is not because of any legal considerations - but simply because I want the full security of "the chain of (cryptographic) signatures" - which, according to the whitepaper, is the very definition of what a bitcoin "is".
Here are the words of Satoshi, from the whitepaper, regarding the "chain of digital signatures":
https://www.bitcoin.com/bitcoin.pdf
We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures. Each owner transfers the coin to the next by digitally signing a hash of the previous transaction and the public key of the next owner and adding these to the end of the coin. A payee can verify the signatures to verify the chain of ownership.
Does that "chain of digital signatures" sound like something you'd want to throw in the trash??
  • The "clever devs" from AXA-owned Blockstream (and a handful of so-called "Bitcoin legal experts) say "Trust us, it is safe to delete the chain of signatures proving ownership and transfer of bitcoins". They're pushing "SegWit" - the most radical change in the history of Bitcoin. As I have repeatedly discussed, SegWit weakens Bitcoin's security model.
  • The people who support Satoshi's original Bitcoin (and clients which continue to implement it: Bitcoin ABC, Bitcoin Unlimited, Bitcoin, Bitcoin Classic - all supporting "Bitcoin Cash" - ie "Bitcoin" without SegWit) say "Trust no one. You should never delete the chain of signatures proving ownership and transfer of your bitcoins."
  • Satoshi said:

We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures.

  • So, according to Satoshi, a "chain of digital signatures" is the very definition of what a bitcoin is.
  • Meanwhile according to some ignorant / corrupt devs from AXA-owned Blockstream (and a handful of "Bitcoin legal experts") now suddenly it's "probably" "fairly" safe to just throw Satoshi's "chain of digital signatures" in the trash - all in the name of "innovation" and "efficiency" and "optimization" - because they're so very clever.
Who do you think is right?
Finally, here's another blatant lie from SegWit supporters (and small-block supporters)
Let's consider this other important quote from Satoshi's whitepaper above:
A payee can verify the signatures to verify the chain of ownership.
Remember, this is what "small blockers" have always been insisting for years.
They've constantly been saying that "blocks need to be 1 MB!!1 Waah!1!" - even though several years ago the Cornell study showed that blocks could already be 4 MB, with existing hardware and bandwidth.
But small-blockers have always insisted that everyone should store the entire blockchain - so they can verify their own transactions.
But hey, wait a minute!
Now they turn around and try to get you to use SegWit - which allows deleting the very data which insisted that you should download and save locally to verify your own transactions!
So, once again, this exposes the so-called "arguments" of small-blocks supporters as being fake arguments and lies:
  • On the one hand, they (falsely) claim that small blocks are necessary in order for everyone to be run "full nodes" because (they claim) that's the only way people can personally verify all their own transactions. By the way, there are already several errors here with what they're saying:
    • Actually "full nodes" is a misnomer (Blockstream propaganda). The correct terminology is "full wallets", because only miners are actually "nodes".
    • Actually 1 MB "max blocksize" is not necessary for this. The Cornell study showed that we could easily be using 4 MB or 8 MB blocks by now - since, as everyone knows, the average size of most web pages is already over 2 MB, and everyone routinely downloads 2 MB web pages in a matter of seconds, so in 10 minutes you could download - and upload - a lot more than just 2 MB. But whatever.
  • On the other hand, they support SegWit - and the purpose of SegWit is to allow people to delete the "signature data".
    • This conflicts with their argument the everyone should personally verify all their own transactions. For example, above, Coin Center director Jerry Brito was saying: "As long as somebody in the world keeps the signature data and it's accessible, it's fine."
    • So which is it? For years, the "small blockers" told us we needed to all be able to personally verify everything on our own node. And now SegWit supporters are telling us: "Naah - you can just rely on someone else's node."
    • Plus, while the transactions are still being sent around on the wire, the "signature data" is still there - it's just "segregated" - so you're not getting any savings on bandwidth anyways - you'd only get the savings if you delete the "signature data" from storage.
    • Storage is cheap and plentiful, it's never been the "bottleneck" in the system. Bandwidth is the main bottleneck - and SegWit doesn't help that at all, because it still transmits all the data.
Conclusion
So if you're confused by all the arguments from small-blockers and SegWitters, there's a good reason: their "arguments" are total bullshit and lies. They're attempting to contradict and destroy:
  • Satoshi's original design of Bitcoin as a "chain of digital signatures":
"We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures. Each owner transfers the coin to the next by digitally signing a hash of the previous transaction and the public key of the next owner and adding these to the end of the coin. A payee can verify the signatures to verify the chain of ownership."
  • Satoshi's plan for scaling Bitcoin by simply increasing the goddamn blocksize:
Satoshi Nakamoto, October 04, 2010, 07:48:40 PM "It can be phased in, like: if (blocknumber > 115000) maxblocksize = largerlimit / It can start being in versions way ahead, so by the time it reaches that block number and goes into effect, the older versions that don't have it are already obsolete."
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/3wo9pb/satoshi_nakamoto_october_04_2010_074840_pm_it_can/
  • The the notorious mortgage database MERS, pushed by clueless and corrupt Wall Street bankers, deleted the "chain of (legal) title" which had been essential to show who conveyed what mortgages to whom - leading to "clouded titles", foreclosure fraud, and robo-signing.
  • The notorious SegWit soft fork / kludge, pushed by clueless and corrupt AXA-owned Blockstream devs, allows deleting the "chain of (cryptographic) signatures" which is essential to show who sent how many bitcoins to whom - which could lead to a catastrophe for people who foolishly use SegWit addresses (which can be avoided: unsafe "SegWit" bitcoin addresses start with a "3" - while safe, "normal" Bitcoin addresses start with a "1").
  • Stay safe and protect your bitcoin investment: Avoid SegWit transactions.
[See the comments from me directly below for links to several articles on MERS, foreclosure fraud, robo-signing, "clouded title", etc.]
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Homelab collective ressources post!

Hey guys!
I'm fairly new to this sub and to having a home lab in general and I found this community to be so kind and helping, I wanted to give back what I've learned. I'm seeing a lot of questions asked around on improvements and on what to do with x extra hardware so I thought it would be nice to have a thread to regroup that.
 
I'll put here some stuff I gathered and the most common questions I've seen, feel free to contribute and i'll update the post along.
 
Latest Additions
 
Homelab Dashboard
Posts about dashboards have been growing lately and here are some of the best that were kind enough to provide us with their sources.
User Screenshot Source
yours truly http://imgur.com/a/GhCNH https://github.com/Gabisonfire/dashboard-q
lastditchefrt http://i.imgur.com/5zQdao4.png https://github.com/d4rk22/Network-Status-Page
_SleepingBag_ http://i.imgur.com/Ql9ZM4W.png https://github.com/jsank/homelabdash
NiknakSi https://niknak.org/extras/sysinfo TBA
DainBramaged http://imgur.com/jYNlUEQ https://github.com/gordonturneBigBoard
michaelh4u https://i.imgur.com/XkZwMKj.png https://github.com/michaelh4u/homelabfrontpage
spigotx http://imgur.com/a/1zMht https://github.com/spigotx/HomeLab2
SirMaster https://nicko88.com/ https://github.com/dashbad/plex-server-status
yourofl10 http://imgur.com/a/AyROa TBA
TheBobWiley http://imgur.com/a/oU6d3 https://github.com/TheBobWiley/ManageThis-LandingPages
0110010001100010 http://i.imgur.com/iwtQcsL.jpg https://github.com/danodemano/monitoring-scripts
mescon & SyNiK4L https://i.imgur.com/gqdVM6p.jpg https://github.com/mescon/Muximux
ak_rex http://i.imgur.com/a/RJkrT https://github.com/ak-rex/homelab-dashboard
 
Or build yours from scratch: PRTG API, ELK, Grafana, freeboard, JumpSquares
 
Some other resources: Custom Monitoring Scripts by 0110010001100010
 
Credits to apt64 for his original post
= Pi specific =
 
= Download Automation =
 
= Virtualization =
 
= Monitoring =
 
= Media Center =
 
= Remote access =
 
= VOIP =
 
= Networking =
 
= File Servers/Storage/RAID =
 
= Cameras =
 
= Documentation =
 
= Dynamic DNS =
 
= Backup =
 
= Creating network diagrams =
 
= Guides =
 
= Misc =
 
That's all I could come up with on top of my head + some research, passing over to you guys so we can get a nice complete list!
 
Let's try and stick with free(or mostly) softwares, let me know if you guys feel otherwise.
submitted by Gabisonfire to homelab [link] [comments]

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